Research Culture Uncovered

Research Culturosity, University of Leeds

At the University of Leeds, we believe that all members of our research community play a crucial role in developing and promoting a positive and inclusive research culture. Across the globe, the urgent need for a better Research Culture in Higher Education is widely accepted – but how do you make it happen? This weekly podcast focuses on our ideas, approaches and learning as we contribute to the University's attempt to create a Research Culture in which everyone can thrive. Whether you undertake, lead, fund or benefit from research - these are the conversations to listen to if you want to explore what a positive Research Culture is and why it matters. Unless specified in the episode shownotes, Research Culture Uncovered © 2023 by Research Culturosity, University of Leeds is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. This license requires that reusers give credit to the creator. If you remix, adapt, or build upon the material, you must license the modified material under identical terms. Some episodes may be licensed under CC BY-ND 4.0, please check before use. read less
Society & CultureSociety & Culture

Episodes

(S7E7) The Research Culture Enablers Network: Building a Better Culture Together
2d ago
(S7E7) The Research Culture Enablers Network: Building a Better Culture Together
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 7, our host Emma Spary is speaking to Rika Nair (LinkedIn), Elisa Clemente (LinkedIn), and Cathal Rogers (LinkedIn), members of the Research Culture Enablers Network. We discuss the origins and aspirations of the network, delve into why it's crucial for professionals to collaborate, and discuss how this can drive significant advancements in research culture. They also share personal motivations for engaging with research culture challenges and outline priorities like job security, diversity, participation, and elevating the roles of research enablers.The main points include:How the network was formed to enhance work on improving research cultureInclusivity for those without dedicated roles but with interests in research cultureReflections on the main issues and priorities in research cultureEmphasis on job security, equality, diversity, and the value of research enablersThe network’s approach to sharing best practices and experiencesPlans for hosting another annual International Research Culture conferenceIn this episode we mention several links including:A link to the network: https://warwick.ac.uk/research/research-culture-at-warwick/best-practice/rcen/How to join the network: https://warwick.ac.uk/research/research-culture-at-warwick/best-practice/rcen/join/Research Excellence Framework: https://www.ref.ac.uk/The Research Culture Conference: https://warwick.ac.uk/research/ncrc/irccThe PRISM network: https://www.pris-managers.ac.uk/Link to the second Research Culture Enablers Network podcast released 24th April 2024: https://player.captivate.fm/episode/9956719f-2f4a-4743-a4b0-d4500cadfec2This episode of Research Culture Uncovered © 2024 by Research Culturosity is licensed under CC BY-ND 4.0 All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)
(Bonus) Unveiling the Art of Podcasting with Hannah Preston and Jana Javornik
03-04-2024
(Bonus) Unveiling the Art of Podcasting with Hannah Preston and Jana Javornik
In our fortnightly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this bonus episode, Ged Hall, Academic Development Consultant for Research Impact, chats to Hannah Preston, Research Communications Manager from Leeds University Business School, and Dr Jana Javornik, Associate Professor of Work and Employment Relations, also in the Business School.Hannah has been the driving force behind the Business School's Research and Innovation podcast since 2020. She joined forces with Jana in late 2023 to launch a new podcast called The Business of Policymaking. The three key takeaways from the discussion of podcasting in the academic field were: 1.  Podcasts are a powerful tool for transforming complex academic research into accessible discussions, broadening its impact.2.  Cultivating a dedicated listener base that can translate insights into action is more valuable than chasing download statistics.3.   Hosting podcasts offers unique learning experiences and the opportunity to hear from a diverse range of influential voices. Hannah also mentioned the Business School's Research andInnovation blog in the interview.If you would like to engage with Hannah, you can find her on Twitter and LinkedIn.If you would like to engage with Jana, you can find her on Twitter and LinkedIn.All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists: Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn) Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn) Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn) Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and
(S7 E6) From setback to success: supporting researchers after unsuccessful funding applications with Anna Pilz
27-03-2024
(S7 E6) From setback to success: supporting researchers after unsuccessful funding applications with Anna Pilz
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In episode 6 of season 7, Anna Pilz (Academic Developer and Trainer at the University of Edinburgh) once again joins Taryn Bell (Researcher Development Adviser) to discuss research fellowships.This time, we're taking a slightly different tack and discussing what happens when research applications aren't successful. What can researcher developers do to provide support during such a difficult time for researchers?The main points include:Highlighting how common funding rejections areThe importance of hearing from researchers who have faced 'unsuccess' previouslyAcknowledging that the stakes may vary for researchers facing rejection, with precariously employed researchers needing additional supportAnna's work at Edinburgh supporting researchers after an unsuccessful applicationThe role of researcher developers in helping to prepare researchers for a rejection, even before they've submitted!Also mentioned in the episode:#ResearcherRealities: Unsuccessful grants and what to do with themLeeds' new Fellowship Accelerator ProgrammeOur previous episodes on narrative CVs (Episode 1 and Episode 2)All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter...
(Bonus) Exploring Grimpact: The Other Side of Research Impact with Gemma Derrick
20-03-2024
(Bonus) Exploring Grimpact: The Other Side of Research Impact with Gemma Derrick
In our Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this bonus episode, Ged Hall, Academic Development Consultant for Research Impact, chats to Dr Gemma Derrick about her current research project "At What Cost Societal Impact? How Research Culture and Governance Inspires Grimpact." Gemma is an Associate Professor in University of Bristol. Her research interests include researcher behaviour, academic practice, research evaluation, societal impact, the research workforce and its governance (e.g. peer review systems), and the politics and dynamics of knowledge production and translation. She has investigated the effects of national audit frameworks, such as the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and others, to demonstrate their strengths and weaknesses in relation to their stated aims. Gemma has also previously been on the podcast talking about the Hidden REF.Here are three key takeaways from the discussion of grimpact: 1.   We need to shift our research culture away from a blind focus on reward to ensure that we aren’t blind to failures. When we are blind to failures we fail to learn from them. 2.   To do that we need much greater reflexivity throughout the research process at both the individual and organisational level. 3.   Which also means that we need to monitor for grimpact not just build our monitoring and evaluation systems around a blind focus on positive impact. If you would like to find out more about Gemma’s project, head over to her website: https://www.grimpact.org/. You can also get in touch with Gemma via @GemmaDerrick and connect with her on LinkedIn or email (details on her University of Bristol profile page. All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists: Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn) Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn) Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn) Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and
(S7E5) From Idea to Application: Supporting Research Fellowship Applicants with Anna Pilz
13-03-2024
(S7E5) From Idea to Application: Supporting Research Fellowship Applicants with Anna Pilz
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In episode 5 of season 7, Anna Pilz (Academic Developer and Trainer at the University of Edinburgh) joins Taryn Bell (Researcher Development Adviser) to discuss research fellowships.We discuss the added value researcher developers can bring to the application process, how Anna's own experiences applying for fellowships have shaped her practice as a researcher developer, and how we can best support researchers as they go through the practical and emotional challenges involved.The main points include:The importance of acknowledging the lived realities faced by researchers, particularly early career researchers on precarious contractsHow to use fellowship applications as an opportunity for long-term professional development and reflection on career goalsHow researcher developers can bust common myths about fundingThe role of emotional intelligence to support researchers throughout the processResources mentioned in the episode include:A Comprehensive Guide to Fellowship ApplicationsThe University of Edinburgh's Researcher Realities seriesThe University of Leeds' Fellowships and Grants webpageLeeds' new Fellowship Accelerator ProgrammeAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and
(S7E4) Meet the Culturositists: Introducing Taryn Bell and careers
28-02-2024
(S7E4) Meet the Culturositists: Introducing Taryn Bell and careers
In our Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? This episode is part of Season 7, but we go back to the format we used in Season 1 where we got to meet the hosts in a bit more detail before they hosted seasons on their specialist topic. In this episode of Research Culture Uncovered, host Emma Spary introduces Dr Taryn Bell, the newest member of the podcast team. Taryn discusses her role as a researcher development advisor with a focus on career development at the University of Leeds. She shares her personal experience with career challenges and the importance of comprehensive career support for researchers. Taryn also previews her upcoming episodes, which will focus on fellowships, funding, and the emotional side of career development. You can connect to Taryn via LinkedInI ask Taryn what she thinks the biggest challenges are for researchers, what we do well at Leeds, where she thinks we can improve and what she hopes to see in the future. Her main messages include:the challenge of getting researchers to prioritize career development alongside their research responsibilitiesthe perception of long-term career development workshops being a significant time investment for researchersovercoming fear and discomfort associated with career planning and developmentTaryn's excitement about launching the Fellowship Accelerator program for postdoc researchersthe importance of early intervention and support for fellowship applicantsthe emphasis on incorporating emotional support into career development initiativesWhat will she be covering in her upcoming episodes:a focus on supporting researchers in fellowship applications and managing unsuccessful funding applicationsAI and its impact on career developmentthe importance of "bedrock skills" in the future workplace and the link to AI and careersBe sure to check out the other episodes in Season 1 to find out more about the hosts Emma Spary, Ged Hall, Tony Bromley and Nick Sheppard with a few special guest appearances.All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)
(S7E3) Changing Behaviour with Daryl O'Connor: A Psychology Professor's Journey through Open Research
14-02-2024
(S7E3) Changing Behaviour with Daryl O'Connor: A Psychology Professor's Journey through Open Research
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In episode 3 of Season 7, Daryl O'Connor, Professor of Psychology at the University of Leeds joins Nick Sheppard, Open Research Advisor and Ruth Winden, Careers with Research Consultant, to discuss all things Open Research, Research Culture, and Careers.We delve into: Daryl's long-standing commitment to advocating for Open Research - and why Open Research plays such a key role in not just academics' careers but also in creating a collaborative, equitable and positive Research Culture as a wholeHow a publication in Science in 2015 shaped Daryl's research interests, his engagement with research - and his entire career How and why Psychology played such an important role in creating the Reciprobability movement, and why it really isn't a Psychology problem, but an overall challenge for ALL sciences.How to build a researcher career, and why collaboration has to be at the centre of it.How professional associations can play a huge part in building one's research career - and why taking on leadership roles in committees, associations, and international networks offers so much to our professional and personal development.Why the most impactful way to change Research Culture for the better is to change the reward and recognition structure in academia. A quote from Daryl: "... it's about changing the reward and recognition structure that will really change behaviour, which will change Open Research".If you'd like to find out more about Daryl's work, please check out the following links:Twitter/X: Daryl O’Connor @healthpsycleedsThe Laboratory for Stress and Health Research (STARLAB) led by Daryl O'Connor https://sites.google.com/site/doconnorlab/Daryl's extensive University profile: https://medicinehealth.leeds.ac.uk/psychology/staff/2725/professor-daryl-o-connorOpen lunch talks with Daryl:Preregistration and the architecture of open scienceThe UK Reproducibility Network (UKRN): promoting robust and trustworthy researchAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on
(S7E2) The Concordat and manager engagement: A closer look at the challenges
31-01-2024
(S7E2) The Concordat and manager engagement: A closer look at the challenges
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 7, we explore the challenges of engaging managers of researchers in supporting their teams, especially in implementing the Researcher Development Concordat. We discuss the pressure and expectations faced by managers, the difficulties managers face in conducting career conversations and the need for researchers to prepare for, and engage in, these discussions. We also share insights from their work in implementing the Researcher Development Concordat at the University of Leeds, highlighting the importance of open career conversations and the need for academic institutions to prioritise career development for their staff. The main points include:Difficulty could include time pressure and unrealistic expectationsThe need for more confidence and support for managersThe responsibility of researchers to prepare for career conversations and engage with managersManager discussions help researchers clarify their career path and make informed decisionsThe development of a program to help faculty members run group-based career coaching programsEmphasising the availability of resources and support for managersEncouraging managers not to feel pressured to know all career options and to seek support and expert advice from career professionalsAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research co-productionResearch LeadershipResearch EvaluationFollow us on twitter:
(S7E1) The RCU Roundtable: Our Predictions and Strategies for Research Culture in 2024
17-01-2024
(S7E1) The RCU Roundtable: Our Predictions and Strategies for Research Culture in 2024
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 7, we start 2024 with an episode featuring all of the hosts, discussing our predictions for how research culture may evolve as we step into 2024.Each host lays out what they think is coming, and how they might approach it, in each of their respective areas:Ged Hall highlights the importance of team perspectives in research success. What approaches do we suggest for effectively capturing and integrating these team insights within an academic setting.Ruth Winden discusses AI becoming increasingly prominent in research, what are potential challenges and opportunities that may affect career management and development for researchers.Tony Bromley brings in the possible impact from ongoing government policies on the employability and career pathways of postgraduate researchers.Nick Sheppard covers some best practices for research institutions when it comes to data governance and fostering open research collaborations.Emma Spary discusses REF and the need to ensure the institution's submission is both comprehensive and genuinely reflective of collaborative work.The main points include:Collaboration is Key: From Wikimedia initiatives to international teamwork, the power of joint effort is a game-changer in research culture.AI and Careers: With AI transforming every industry, it's crucial for researchers to integrate this technology in their work, while skillfully navigating the career landscape.Impact and Openness: Embrace the shift towards recognising wider contributions in research and the increasing importance of open research practices.Delving into Roles and Recognition: Debating the roles and titles in research support, Ged and Nick emphasised the importance of recognising the value of these professions.Facing Challenges Together: How to manage online and face-to-face professional development post-COVID.All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on
(Bonus) Nick's review of the year: open research, knowledge equity and Wikimedia
03-01-2024
(Bonus) Nick's review of the year: open research, knowledge equity and Wikimedia
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered podcast we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode Nick Sheppard looks back at a year in open research, reflecting on some of the projects he has been involved with including the Knowledge Equity Network and a successful Wikimedia Champions project. Nick is Open Research Advisor based in the University of Leeds Libraries and one of the Senior Leads for the Knowledge Equity Network.Some of the topics discussed include:How open research and knowledge equity are supported by WikimediaBenefits for universities of engaging strategically with Wikimedia in the areas of information literacy and research impactA project to develop a series of 75 open research case studies across different disciplines and research methodologiesThe Open Lunch series of virtual talks that explore different aspects of open practiceHow open research relates to and is an integral part of broader research cultureLinks:Knowledge for all: University of Leeds Libraries Vision for 2030Inside Track | Helping transform lives through open researchKEN event recordings on YouTubeChampioning knowledge equity with Wikimedia (Library blog post)The winners of the 2023 UK Wikimedian of the Year AwardsOpen Research Case studies by facultyOpen Research Case Studies: Are Research Methods Open? (Library blog post)Online resource developed with the Digital Education Service introducing the guiding principles and aims of open research Open Lunch archiveN8 Rights Retention StatementUniversity of Leeds Research Culture Strategy 2023 - 2028UK Reproducibility Network | UKRN Indicators of Open ResearchMaking your...
(Bonus) Embodying Impact: A Conversation with Early Career Impact Prize Winners
13-12-2023
(Bonus) Embodying Impact: A Conversation with Early Career Impact Prize Winners
In our Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this really special bonus episode Ged Hall talks to Dr Vicki Jenneson and Dr Fran Pontin.  Vicki is a Research Fellow and works in the School of Food Science and Nutrition and her research interests are focused on nutrition and lifestyle analytics. Fran is a Research Data Scientist in the Consumer Data Research Centre and part-time Lecturer in the Centre for Spatial Analysis and Policy in the School of Geography.They are both members of the Consumer Research Data Centre’s (CDRC) Nutrition and Lifestyle Analytics Team that won the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) Celebrating Impact Prize in the ‘Outstanding Impact in Business and Enterprise’ category. Their project, ‘Enhancing retailer knowledge and building capacity using consumer data.’, is a collaboration with Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD) and major retailers, including Asda and Sainsbury’s, that delivers evidence-based research about what works and what doesn’t when it comes to encouraging healthy behaviours in consumers.Vicki and Fran are both early career researchers who started their PhDs in 2017 in the first cohort of the Data Analytics and Society Centre for Doctoral Training funded by ESRC. This episode focuses in on the development of their academic identifies and the role research impact plays in this. This can often be intimidating for researchers who are early in their research careers. The discussion was prompted by a chapter Ged wrote with Dr Helen Morley and Dr Tony Bromley called ‘Uncertainty and Confusion: The starting point of all expertise’ (in the book Research Impact and the Early Career Researcher). The chapter explores issues such as imposter syndrome (and its three types ‘existentialists’ who seek external validation, ‘aspirants’ who are striving for an idealised academic identity and those who self-perceive themselves as intellectually inferior) and the three trajectories of developing an academic identity (intellectual, institutional and networking) that were proposed by McAlpine and others (in the book Becoming an Academic).The main points from the discussion include:The significance of collaborative work across professional and academic teams and the advantages of building networks in conducting impactful research, as noted by Vicki. Both Vicki and Fran's candid admission that there's still much to learn and explore about research impact - reinforcing that it's OK to have uncertainties and questions.The importance of communicating complex data science methods and results in a clear, convincing manner to non-data scientists. This is a skill that Vicki and Fran emphasize can make a significant difference in the impact of research.But the most importantly take away is that early career researchers can and do contribute significantly to the generation of prize winning and important impact.You can find out more about the prize, the project and CDRC via these links:
(S6E7) The Bee's Knees: Uncovering the Secrets of Research Culture in the Hive
29-11-2023
(S6E7) The Bee's Knees: Uncovering the Secrets of Research Culture in the Hive
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this short 10 minute episode of Season 6, Emma Spary is taking a unique approach by combining her passion for research culture with an unexpected subject: bees. As a new beekeeper, Emma has been reflecting on the similarities between the culture within a beehive and the work we do to improve research culture.What can we learn from Willow and the girls? This episode explores various aspects of the hive culture, highlighting the importance of unity, community, and support among the bees. From the role of the queen bee to the diverse responsibilities of different bees within the hive, she uncovers valuable lessons that could be applied to research culture. Join us to gain fresh insights, stimulate new thoughts, and perhaps even discover things about bees that you may not have known before. The main points include:Importance of hive culture in beekeeping.Collective responsibility to create a strong colony.Collective decision-making in the hive.Equality of different roles and attributes.Opportunities for bees to try different roles.Importance of clear and detailed messages.All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research co-productionFollow us on twitter: @ResDevLeeds (new episodes are announced here), @OpenResLeeds, @ResCultureLeeds Connect to us...
(S6E6) Unlocking Researchers' Career Success Through Group Programs
15-11-2023
(S6E6) Unlocking Researchers' Career Success Through Group Programs
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 6, Emma Spary is joined by Ruth Winden, shedding light on the power of group dynamics in career development programmes.How do group dynamics add value to the career development process? This episode emphasises the power of group dynamics, celebrating early wins, and fostering long-term career transformation. Through our cohort-based programs, we aim not just to help individuals gain confidence and self-belief, but also to highlight the importance of shared experiences, mutual support, and diverse perspectives. The underlying goal? To help researchers recognise their own skills and expertise, and navigate their careers confidently. The main points include:Importance of groups in providing support, validation, and affirmationRole of facilitators in building trust and conflict managementPersonal engagement and recognition that researchers are not alone in career strugglesRisks associated with the wrong mix of participants The challenges and rewards that come with this approach. To hear more from previous participants of our career development programmes, take a listen to Ruth's season on Research Careers All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research co-productionFollow us on twitter: @ResDevLeeds (new episodes are announced here),
Research for All: The "How to Fix..." podcast offers actionable solutions.
08-11-2023
Research for All: The "How to Fix..." podcast offers actionable solutions.
🎧 Bonus Episode! 📢 Recently Ged Hall had the pleasure of talking to Kersti Mitchell, External Communications and Campaigns Manager, and Dr Jim McQuaid, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Composition, about the University of Leeds's new podcast “How to fix …”It was an insightful conversation that explored the importance of research culture and how to make academic content accessible to a wider audience. 🔍 Here are 3 key takeaways from the episode: 1️⃣ Collaborative Approach: Research culture thrives on collaboration and teamwork. By bringing together academics from various disciplines, we can address complex issues like air pollution, cost of healthy food and violence towards women more effectively. 2️⃣ Accessible Research: We discussed the need to make research more accessible to the general public. Through the How to Fix… podcast, we aim to empower listeners with practical advice and insights from experts, like Dr. Jim McQuaid, who shared valuable tips on reducing pollution and improving indoor air quality. 3️⃣ Impactful Engagement: The success of the podcast can be measured by various indicators, such as other universities taking notice, policymakers listening, and engagement from students and the general public. We also discussed using metrics to understand our audience, including gender and age breakdowns, as well as social media engagement. How are you making your research accessible and would a podcast be the way to go? We’d love to hear your thoughts. Kersti and Jim mentioned a number of things in the interview that may be of interest:UK Government Chief Medical Officer annual resport on air pollution.Death of Awaab Ishak due to mould and the new guidance that emerged from that tragic story.Policy Leeds and their services (follow on X via @policyleeds and LinkedIn)Knowledge Equity Network - development and enactment of a declaration to reduce inequalities through increased access to knowledgeProfessor Cath Noakes and Dr James TateBorn in Bradford - one of the largest research studies in the World, tracking the lives of over 30,000 Bradfordians to find...
(S6E5) Virtual Cafés, Real Conversations: Findings from our Research Culture Cafés
01-11-2023
(S6E5) Virtual Cafés, Real Conversations: Findings from our Research Culture Cafés
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 6, Emma Spary discusses how research culture cafes can help institutions better understand their current research culture.Emma explains how we created an open and inclusive environment where people could share their lived experiences of the research culture at the University of Leeds. How this enabled us to uncover both the positives and the challenges of our culture. She shares some of the main findings, and highlights the impact of these cafes in gathering valuable insights and data that informed the university's approach to enhancing their research culture.The main points include:Importance of open, honest, and transparent conversations about research cultureFocus on both positive aspects and challenges of research cultureGenerating ideas for improving research cultureHow research culture cafes workSome of our results and outcomes of the research culture cafesOpen sharing of findings to participants and non-participantsA direct link between our findings and our ongoing workAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research co-productionFollow us on twitter: @ResDevLeeds (new episodes are announced here), @OpenResLeeds, @ResCultureLeeds Connect to us on LinkedIn:
(Bonus) From Lay Summaries to Impactful Engagement: Uncovering the Potential of the Collaborative Library
22-10-2023
(Bonus) From Lay Summaries to Impactful Engagement: Uncovering the Potential of the Collaborative Library
🔍 The Collaborative Library where we can all collaborate to share knowledge🎙️ Are you passionate about open and impactful research? Looking for aplatform that connects researchers, students, and the broader audience? The lookno further!📢 Nick Sheppard and Ged Hall, had the privilege of speaking with AnjaHarrison, the Chief Executive of the Collaborative Library, on our latestepisode of Research Culture Uncovered podcast. The Collaborative Libraryis revolutionising research communication and opening doors for studentsand researchers to publish their lay summaries, making academic knowledgeaccessible to all.🚀 Here are three key takeaways from our conversation:1. Bridging the gap: The Collaborative Library aims to bridge the gap between existing research networks and efforts. They provide a dynamic hub where researchers can engage with the broader community and expand their impact network. Imagine connecting with like-minded individuals globally who are passionate about your research!2. Empowering students: The Collaborative Library offers an innovative approach to skills development and assessment by encouraging students to produce lay summaries as a part of their coursework. By harnessing their creativity and skills, students contribute valuable content to the platform while gaining hands-on experience in science communication. Let's elevate student work to new heights!3. Inclusivity and Open Practice: The platform promotes inclusivity, embracing diverse perspectives and co-producing research. Lay summaries can be submitted in various formats, including written, audio, and video. This immersive experience not only encourages the exploration of complex scientific concepts but also combines science with human artistic expression.Let's make research accessible to all!🔗 If you are interested in getting involved, sharing your thoughts, or becoming part of the Collaborative Library's working group, don't hesitate to reach out hello@thecollaborativelibrary.com and take a look at the website: https://thecollaborativelibrary.com/ Other links mentioned in the episode were: United Kingdom Council of Open Research and RepositoriesUK Reproducibility NetworkAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists: Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn) Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn) Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)
(S6E4) Rethinking Research Spaces: Developing a Medical Humanities Lab and Redefining Research Practices
18-10-2023
(S6E4) Rethinking Research Spaces: Developing a Medical Humanities Lab and Redefining Research Practices
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 6, Emma Spary chats with Dr Clare Barker and Professor Amelia DeFalco from the University of Leeds about the LivingBodiesObjects project they are working on, empowering alternative ways of conducting research. In this project funded by a Wellcome Trust Research Development Award, the team is pioneering a non-hierarchical leadership model that prioritises accessibility, care, and accountability. They emphasise the importance of creating safe and inclusive spaces, challenging conventional approaches, and bridging the gap between researchers and those being researched.Key topics and messages:Importance of creating safe spaces and pushing beyond comfort zonesBenefits and challenges of developing a non-hierarchical leadership model based on accessibility, care, and accountabilityAlternative research approaches resisting productivity and competitionCollaboration with Creative Partners for accessible formats using technologyBridging the gap between researchers and those being researchedSpace for experimentation, risk-taking, and learning from mistakesEmphasising health, well-being, and collaboration in the projectThis episode focusses on the LivingBodiesObjects project, funded by a Wellcome Trust Research Development Award. You can connect to Clare (@clarefbarker) and Amelia (@AmeliaDefalco) on Twitter/X. You can also follow the project @LBObjectsAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)
(Bonus) Celebrating Research Diversity: The Hidden REF's Bid to Recognise Non-traditional Outputs
11-10-2023
(Bonus) Celebrating Research Diversity: The Hidden REF's Bid to Recognise Non-traditional Outputs
In our fortnightly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this bonus episode, Ged Hall, Academic Development Consultant for Research Impact, chats to Dr Gemma Derrick about research evaluation and the Hidden REF. Gemma is an Associate Professor in University of Bristol. Her research interests include researcher behaviour, academic practice, research evaluation, societal impact, the research workforce and its governance (e.g. peer review systems), and the politics and dynamics of knowledge production and translation. She has investigated the effects of national audit frameworks, such as the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and others, to demonstrate their strengths and weaknesses in relation to their stated aims.  She is also a member of the organising committee of the Hidden REF ‘that is fighting for a more effective and fairer system of evaluating success in research.’ Here are three key takeaways from the episode: Hidden REF: Driven by a passion for celebrating the full spectrum of research contributions, the Hidden REF movement has grown from its first exercise, in 2021, to a full-blown festival that happened on 21st September 2023. Its aim is to acknowledge the essential contributors to vibrant research culture who may not fit traditional evaluation criteria. The next Hidden REF exercise is in 2024. Beyond REF: While the REF is changing for 2028, it will always have limitations. Many valuable research outputs that make the field rich and diverse have gone unnoticed. The Hidden REF promotes a celebration-based approach to research culture, ensuring that nobody is left behind, hidden or undervalued. Changing the Landscape: The Hidden REF is calling for change and aims to build sector confidence in evaluating non-traditional outputs fairly and transparently. By encouraging institutions to sign up to its manifesto for non-traditional outputs making up at least 5% of their submissions, we will strengthen our research culture by recognising everyone who contributes. To get involved in the Hidden REF: Follow it on X (formerly Twitter) @HiddenRef Subscribe to its mailing list on its Contacts page Or info@hidden-ref.org Submit to its next exercise in 2024 You can also get in touch with Gemma via @GemmaDerrick and connect with her on LinkedIn. Other members of the Hidden REF organising committee were interviewed in this episode on the code4thought podcast. All of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists: Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and
(S6E3) Harnessing the Power of Collaboration: Writing Persuasive Team-Based Narrative CVs
04-10-2023
(S6E3) Harnessing the Power of Collaboration: Writing Persuasive Team-Based Narrative CVs
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 6, Emma Spary chats with Dr Elizabeth Adams from Scafell Coaching on the concept of team-based Narrative CVs (or the Resume for Research and Innovation) and its significance in highlighting the holistic contributions of researchers. Whether you're new to narrative CVs or currently grappling with them, this episode will help you navigate the limited space and balance the expertise of multiple team members. It has practical advice on agreeing on the strengths and contributions of individuals, and how to craft a coherent narrative that showcases your team's abilities.Our main points include:Difficulty of writing team-based narrative CVsLimited space and need to demonstrate expertise of the teamEncouraging individuals to reflect on their own strengths and contributionsFocusing on the strategic input and capacity of individualsEnsuring a smooth flow and coherence in the narrativeThis episode focusses on writing Narrative CVs as a team, there is another episode looking at writing them as an individual (S6E2). Emma mentions a resource created by the University of Leeds to support the writing of the Narrative CVs, we have made this available under a CC-BY-SA licence.You can connect to Elizabeth on Twitter (@researchdreams) or LinkedInAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)
(S6E2) Narrative CVs in Research: Showcasing the Value of Every Contribution
04-10-2023
(S6E2) Narrative CVs in Research: Showcasing the Value of Every Contribution
In our weekly Research Culture Uncovered conversations we are asking what is Research Culture and why does it matter? In this episode of Season 6, Emma Spary chats with Dr Elizabeth Adams from Scafell Coaching on the concept of Narrative CVs (or the Resume for Research and Innovation) and its significance in highlighting the holistic contributions of researchers. If you're curious about how Narrative CVs can be a game-changer in evaluating research work, this episode is a must-listen! Discover how these CVs allow researchers to showcase their hidden work, contribute to research culture, and challenge the existing approaches to evaluation.Our main points include:Potential benefits of narrative CVs in research cultureUncovering hidden work and showcasing valuable contributionsChallenges of writing narrative CVs including time constraints time constraints for writing and reviewingLanguage and reflective skills as potential challengesThis episode focusses on writing Narrative CVs as an individual, there is another episode looking at writing them as part of a research team (S6E3). Emma mentions a resource created by the University of Leeds to support the writing of the Narrative CVs, we have made this available under a CC-BY-SA licence.You can connect to Elizabeth on Twitter (@researchdreams) or LinkedInAll of our episodes can be accessed via the following playlists:Research Impact with Ged Hall (follow Ged on Twitter and LinkedIn)Open Research with Nick Sheppard (follow Nick on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research Careers with Ruth Winden (follow Ruth on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research talent management with Tony Bromley (follow Tony on Twitter and LinkedIn)Meet the Research Culturositists with Emma Spary (follow Emma on Twitter and LinkedIn)Research...