Musn't Grumble

Deep Singh / Carl Wilks

Our Mission We, Deep and Carl, think that the majority of ordinary people in the West like us, and the world, are totally fed up with where the world is, and is headed. The stripping away of our basic rights, the failures of our political systems, endemic corruption, language control, the cost-of-living crisis, massive inequality, failing infrastructures, transfer of wealth from ordinary people to the few in mad form of crony capitalism, forever wars, total abuse of human rights of people around the world, must all end. As people, we are more than our social designations, whether they be racial, ethnic, gender, religious, national, or whatever self-designation people want to choose. Most importantly, we are human beings with many facets to ourselves, some contradictory, other complementary. That’s a fact of all of us. We want to reflect the complexity of what we are as human beings in our content. But we also want to simplify and drill into things that unite us and we all need. Practically, an environment that allows us to live in peace and bring up our loved ones without daily insecurities. Psychologically, our interconnectedness, what unites us all, and the way human behaviour, despite the political and social labels attached to it is surprisingly the same. Excessive power is the same, no matter where it is exercised. Biting hunger has the same effect no matter what your identity. So, while we will focus on the most egregious examples, and individuals responsible, for what is degrading our world in every sphere of human life, it’s also a mirror on how humans act. Perhaps, in that understanding lies, hope. Our political position is simple. We believe the nation state, and the local communities that it contains, is still the only framework that can fulfil the needs of a people. Within this structure, the major role of the government is to look after its people. This means a total separation between the political and business spheres. The business of government is government for all, not business. The business of business is business for itself, not government. We are part of those seeking the truths underlying our world — with an agenda. We know that if you can make a world, then you make it a better world. We need to take this as our mission in life. We welcome people from every nation and culture who seek a deeper, shared understanding of the world and connection with others, and we invite everyone to engage with ideas and activate them in our, and your, community. The elite in Britain conditioned people to not grumble. It’s time we turned that on its head. Oh well, Musn’t Grumble, eh? read less
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Episodes

Musn't Grumble Why Not?
09-04-2024
Musn't Grumble Why Not?
The class system in Britain has always been controlled by the elite, Part of that control, as we can see more blatantly around us today, was control through language. So phrases like, 'Mustn't Grumble' were imposed on the working class to ensure that they accepted all the hardships that were thrust upon them by wars, greed and social neglect, without a murmur of dissent. It was not confined to the working class. The middle class had its equivalent in 'Stiff Upper Lip' who were conditioned to do the same. D H Lawrence's infamous novel, Lady Chatterley's Lover, is an exposition of this enforced mindset. Lord Chatterley is physically and emotionally imprisoned by it, and she can only find fullfillment by breaking the class and social barriers she lives in by having an intimate, unbounded relationship with her gamekeeper. What does that show? Our shared humanity is vital for our lives. Today, we no longer need to accept what our elites tell us. We don't need their words, their values which are ultimately selfish and inhuman, and we certainly do not need them in control of our country that is being destroyed. Our children not able to get decent jobs, buy houses, unable to plan for their future and families. Our political system is broken. The social and civic contract that makes a healthy society is irrepiarably broken. What has happened to the country that used to be vibrant, creative and optimistic? Our eyes are now open to what is happening in our world and why. That's why we are called Musn't Grumble because we are challenging the very basis on which Britain is (not) working and we need to remove the system that does not work for the greater good. We need to talk about Britain. And our World. So, let's do it.
American Myths Are Different... But Not in a Good Way
02-04-2024
American Myths Are Different... But Not in a Good Way
American Myths Are Unique But Not In a Good Way To understand America (the country it is and the world we live in) is to look understand its myths and how they differ from those of other nations and cultures because that reveals so much of the mindset that created them and the country. America is not unique in creating its myths. All nations and cultures create and maintain their own myths, but they come from within a social framework and events over a period of time and reflect a sense of shared identity. Without that, they cannot exist because only a few would understand them, and therefore, they would be meaningless. That is why often the stories they tell are contradictory reflecting all the paradoxes that are part of human and societal experience of different elements of society. Equally importantly, in other societies, they are not constantly referenced as integral to current elite actions and lives. They are a backstory of a people. While the original myth about King Arthur (a very human figure who suffers a great deal in his personal life as he aims to build a better, more just world), it is believed, arose from Celtic traditions rooted in loss of their lands to the invading Angles and Saxons, it eventually evolved to represent all Britain including the descendants of those same Angles and Saxons who now shared their identity with a greater whole. Arthur of the Britons became Arthur of Britain to unify all. The mythical, Indian epic, Mahabharata, ostensibly tells the story of an extended royal family, the Kauravas and the Pandavas, in Northern India, who are clearly Indo-Aryans because they are described as tall and fair in contrast to Krishna who is short and dark thus from the Indian heartland but also a cousin of the Pandavas,  (there is even a character called Karan whose description is of someone with blonde hair, blue eyes and illegitimate, thus the ultimate outsider but eventually accepted). They, living outside Hindu precepts, bloodily fall out in a fight for the throne. The aim is to skewer them for their selfish hedonism. Yet in fact, it ends up inadvertently showing a nobility to their social conventions and emotions that makes them both modern and appealing. (Duryodhana, the main antagonist). At the same time, Krishna, deified as a Hindu god, comes over as a destructive force whose motivations, never completely clear but often voiced in ethical and metaphysical constructs, lead to the complete annihilation of the world and the death of nearly everyone, including ultimately himself. Yet paradoxically, it is a Hindu epic because of its philosophical framework. But India is more than a Hindu country and culture so the poem reflects a more complicated and richer mixture of people and issues so all Indians can identify with it.  (Going to watch The Ramayana with thousands of others in the dark.) The Shahnameh (Book of Kings) has for centuries helped define Iran and the Iranian people, as well as ensuring the importance of the Persian language. China has a huge range of myths covering how the world was created to stories of lost love with people at its centre. Many Russian mythological creatures come from the influence of the Slavic pagan religions of Eastern Europe. Frequently, Christianity altered these tales and turned deities into demons and heroes into saints. Many of the creatures are humanoids or creatures representing humans, so people remain central to the stories. So, why and how were American myths created? And what purpose did they, and do, still serve?  Listen without prejudice!
American People Are Not Stupid to Believe in Conspiracy Theories
03-03-2024
American People Are Not Stupid to Believe in Conspiracy Theories
We all love to tell stories - to ourselves, to others, about ourselves, about them, about the world, and about life. It’s how we make sense of our lives, and the world we live in. Yet, we have a filter in us which alerts us when those stories lose touch with reality. We are not here to discuss particular ‘conspiracy theories’ but look at why they emerge, and why they are most prevalent in America. Conspiracy theories are not new, and greater in number, because of the Internet. They seem to have proliferated, because the Internet allows us to amplify what we may have previously only told our family and friends, and today we live in times of mistrust, when all we have known is proven to be either untrue, or at best, not working in our interests. Before we go further, we need to clarify that there are two types of conspiracy theories. Those most often focussed on, propagated by ordinary people, is an attempt to explain and understand what is going on in their country, their life and their world. Those very rarely focussed on, propagated by the elites, are used to divert attention from reality, enforce a narrative and reinforce their power. The reason why America is the land of conspiracy theories, is not because the American people are stupid – no more than any of us around the world - but because they are the most propagandized people from birth to death on Earth. Many of them viscerally know that the narrative presented to them, about their country, and what goes on within it, and by its elite, does not align with their own personal experience and their reality.