Folklore, Food and Fairytales

Rachel Mosses

A storytelling podcast featuring stories with recipes and food history connected to each episode's story. Is the food in fairytales and folklore really symbolic or does it just make the tale relatable? Food and stories have their own rituals and feed different parts of us. If you had to choose between the two, could you? How is the history of food tied into stories? Will this podcast answer these questions or will there just be a great story and a highly tenuous link to a delicious recipe? You'll have to listen to find out. read less
ArtsArts

Episodes

Tales of Frost and Snow
16-12-2023
Tales of Frost and Snow
A collection of wintery and festive tales for the season: Why the Sea is Salt, The Christmas Bear and Twelve Brothers. The first is 'Why the Sea is Salt' a Norwegian tale adapted from Christmas Fairytales colled by Neil Phillip. The story begins on a bitterly cold Christmas Eve when a poor and hungry man finds himself unable to provide for his family and turns to his rich brother. The brother unwittingly starts him on the road toto a better life, but first he must pay a trip to hell with a side of bacon ......... The second is The Christmas Bear inspired by and adapted from the tale shared by both Lari Don in Fire & Ice and by Margaret Sperry in Scandinavian Stories. The story begins in the coldest part of Norway with a hunter and the capture of a strangely stubborn but wise snow bear. They stop on their journey to find out why a family is forced from their home every Christmas Eve ........ The third is Twelve Brothers, adapted from Folktales of Scandinavia collected by Polly Curren. The story begins when a Queen of the of the cold northern lands who has been blessed with many sons, spills red blood on the white snow and dreams of a daughter. This sets in train a set of entirely unforeseen circumstances ..... You can find more about me and Folklore, Food and Fairytales via my ⁠⁠Linktree⁠⁠ You can find the interviews in my newest interview series here: ⁠⁠How Food Frames Stories⁠⁠. You can find my interviews with storytellers here: ⁠⁠Vernacular Voices of the Storyteller ⁠⁠ You can also ⁠⁠subscribe⁠⁠ here (or just read) my free newsletter for further snippets of folklore, history, stories, vintage recipes, herblore & the occasional cocktail. You can also find out more at ⁠⁠Hestia's Kitchen⁠⁠ which has all past episodes and the connected recipes on the blog.
Food, Funerals & Mourning in the American South - An Interview with Ashley-Anne Masters
12-09-2023
Food, Funerals & Mourning in the American South - An Interview with Ashley-Anne Masters
My current research is around the areas of food and death and the rituals around both. We talk so much about food being a huge part of life but it is also a large part of death and the rituals we have developed to help us cope with loss. The American South is well known for its traditions and rituals around food and funerals and funerary practices so I interviewed Ashley-Anne Masters, a Presbyterian Pastor from North Carolina and we discussed how food can bring us together in grief just as it does during times of great joy. I found this an incredibly comforting and uplifting discussion even though we were discussing nominally sad topics. However, we do talk openly about death, grief and the loss of a family member so if you are not in the right space for that right now, you may want to wait before listening. We also discussed how food and humour and ritual can really be of help during difficult times. Ashley-Anne is a wonderfully warm, incredibly kind, human being and I cannot thank her enough for taking the time to share her thoughts, experiences and memories with me. If you want to know more about Ashley-Anne, you can find her on Instagram or her blog. You can find more about me and Folklore, Food and Fairytales via my Linktree You can find the interviews in my newest interview series here: How Food Frames Stories. You can find my interviews with storytellers here: Vernacular Voices of the Storyteller  You can also subscribe here (or just read) my free newsletter for further snippets of folklore, history, stories, vintage recipes, herblore & the occasional cocktail. You can also find out more at Hestia's Kitchen which has all past episodes and the connected recipes on the blog.
A Cawl Tale or The Cheese Ownership Conundrum
13-06-2023
A Cawl Tale or The Cheese Ownership Conundrum
This episdoe is a little different but I hope you enjoy a wonderful Welsh tale from fantastic storyteller Owen Staton and our chat in which we barely touch the depths of how both food and stories can break down barriers between people and nourish our souls but had a fabulous time in the talking just the same. As a bonus I also interviewed Catherine Warr about her fascinating new book A Yorkshire Year: Folklore, history, traditions as well as finding out all about how she got interested in folklore as well as 'fakelore'. You can find Owen on Twitter and Youtube. As well as being the host of Time Between Times Storytelling Podcast, he also hosts Spectre of the Sea, a folklore and legends podcast with Bethan Briggs-Miller. You can also join Owen as he hosts a Sunday Story every week via Twitter Spaces - one of the best cures I know for the Sunday night blues. You can find Catherine on Twitter and Youtube and her website. Her book is available from Carnegie Publishing or other good booksellers. You can find more about me and the podcast via my Linktree You can find the interviews in my newest interview series here: How Food Frames Stories. You can find my interviews with storytellers here: Vernacular Voices of the Storyteller  You can also subscribe here (or just read) my free newsletter for further snippets of folklore, history, stories, vintage recipes, herblore & the occasional cocktail. You can also find out more at Hestia's Kitchen which has all past episodes and the connected recipes on the blog.  If you'd like to get in touch about the podcast you can find me here
An Appalachian Visit
11-04-2023
An Appalachian Visit
In this episode I talked with Aaron Bobick the host of Appalachian Folklore Podcast and Stories from the Cabin, a storytelling podcast within a podcast and we talked all things food, folklore and story. Aaron is a brewer-turned-distiller by day. His undergraduate and graduate studies were in literature, bibliography, and textual editing where he gained a love for research; for finding the history of any given topic that interests him.  His research into UK folklore is what started his fascination with the history of Appalachian folklore: how the folk practices still seen today through various regions of Appalachia can be traced back to much older practices throughout Europe, and the world. The podcast takes a researched-based, academic-adjacent, look at the world of Appalachian folklore while making it approachable to all listeners. You can find the podcast by following the link above or wherever you get your podcasts and his most recent episode explores one of the topics we discussed in much more detail: Ramp Harvesting, Festival Traditions, and Sustainability. The links I mentioned in the episode: The Cornish Pasty in Northern Michigan by William G Lockwood and Yvonne R Lockwood - Food in Motion, The Migration of Foodstuffs and Cookery Techniques – Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery 1983 Orange Chips - Vittles Article about Chippy Traditions Fried Chicken - This is the Guardian article that I mentioned by Melissa Thompson where she discusses Fried Chicken and racism (my apologies to Melissa as I referenced Korean Fried Chicken in the episode but I should have said karaage from Japan) . Her new book, Motherland, is fabulous and is packed with excellent, mouth-watering recipes. Interview with Robbie Armstrong - How Food Frames Stories Green Bean Casserole - This is the book chapter Aaron references. You can find also find the interviews in my newest interview series here: How Food Frames Stories. You can find my interviews with storytellers here: Vernacular Voices of the Storyteller  You can also subscribe (or just read) my free newsletter for further snippets of folklore, history, stories, vintage recipes, herblore & the occasional cocktail. You can also find out more at Hestia's Kitchen which has all past episodes and the connected recipes on the blog.  If you'd like to get in touch about the podcast you can find me here