The Triad

The Adoption Triad

On the most basic level, the “adoption triad” refers to the three parties directly involved in adoption: birth parents, adoptive parents, and adoptees. Some widen the meaning of the triad to include extended family, supporters, and the community-at-large. The Triad hosts are direct members of the triad, and their discussions tackle heavy subjects that go straight to the heart of adoption. We acknowledge, honor, and listen and offer information to our listening audience so that they can know and grow through their own journey.

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Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

Shelbi Walker, Adoptive Mom
17-06-2022
Shelbi Walker, Adoptive Mom
I am a child of God. I am the wife of an amazing man, Byron Walker, and together, we have three beautiful daughters: Kesha, Bethany, and Olivia. I am an avid dog lover and I adore our brindle Bullmastiff, Baine. I am the youngest daughter of LeRoy and Anna Titus, and the bratty little sister of Shelley Price and Sherre Titus. I am an occasional troublemaker who believes that most of the world's problems can be solved with dinner and good, honest conversation. I am a co-host of the popular podcast, THE TRIAD, the host of a soon-to-be-released television show for TLC and Discovery+, and a former researcher for TLC's beloved show, Long Lost Family. I am a mentor, teacher, encourager, and inspiration to countless people. I am the Chief Executive Officer for GRAITH Foundation, the co-owner of Circle Square Services, and the owner of Manner Of Fact. I am a proud member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated and the Links, Inc. (CA-OC). I attended Fisk University, the State University of New York (SUNY-Empire State), California State Dominguez Hills University, and Trinity Law School. I hold a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, a Master of Science in Behavioral Science, and a Juris Doctorate. I am a philanthropist, and a gym rat, and I never take "No" for an answer. I am not a motivational speaker, rather, I am a light, a magnifying glass, and a mirror to those who want to take their lives or business to the next miraculous level. I am a dream maker and an idea creator. I am relentless in my pursuit of excellence and purpose, and I am here to help others become their best selves. I am Shelbi Walker.
Stefani Beierle
15-06-2022
Stefani Beierle
My name is Stefani, and I am a 30-something-year-old adoptee in Milwaukee, Wisconsin! (Millennials represent!) I have been in reunion since 2019 and it hasn’t been an easy road, to say the least. I was born in Arizona in 1987 and had a closed adoption at 8 days old. Growing up in the small town of Janesville, Wisconsin, I always knew I was adopted and was trained from an early age by my adopted parents to be able to talk about it with ease. This is something I always thought was commendable in my earlier years because more often than not you hear of lies and deceit surrounding adoption. I grew up as Laura, Stefani is my birth name that I have recently taken back. In April of 2019, everything changed; lies and abuse from my adopted family began to unravel when my adoptive mom told me (a month before my wedding) that she had always known I had a full blood sister who was not given up, and they decided to keep that information from me. Once my view on my own adoption and family changed, my whole life changed.   Today I am working towards healing, finding myself, and telling my story. I am passionate about adoption, and the number one thing I want to drive home is that ALL ADOPTION IS TRAUMA!!!! We can survive it and heal if adoptive parents are educated and open to doing what is best for their Adoptee.  Please reach out and ask me any questions about Adoption, my story, or anything else! Thanks for being here and supporting my journey and the adult Adoptee community!
Triad S1E14 Vicki White: Connected To My Roots
02-02-2022
Triad S1E14 Vicki White: Connected To My Roots
I stared at the big brown envelope sitting on my kitchen counter. After 10 minutes I gingerly gathered it to me and sat down at the dining room table. I cautiously slid out the contents. Five days previously, I had made contact with my birth family for the first time. One of my new sisters had sent me this package. Its contents were as precious to me as pure gold: photographs of birth family spanning over 100 years. As I looked into their faces, something changed within me. I felt a connection that I had never felt until then. Tears bubbled up from deep inside. I looked like these people. I saw my mother's hands. They were identical to mine. I felt like they were mine. This was the reconnection I needed to begin the search to finding myself. That paragraph is definitely personal. The more factual part (although it is all personal!) would be that I was born in Oakland, CA at the Salvation Army hospital for unwed mothers, August 13, 1945. I was relinquished two months later and three months after that I was adopted by a very wonderful family. However, in my mind, January 4, 1946 was the day my life began. I never thought about another mother or what my life was like the days before. But in my unspoken heart, I was feeling a growing sense of dissatisfaction and malaise. I didn't know myself. I very easily felt rejected. I married in 1970 and was very co-dependent most of those years. By 1996, I had no sense of my identity or sense of direction. I needed control. I went to Therapy. I wanted to look at my adoption as a possible reason for the huge hole I was feeling. Fast forward, I began the search for my Birth Mother. I learned from the investigator that my mother, Lucille, had died of cancer in April 1995, but they had located my Birth Family, 3 sisters. On March 12, 2000 I made the call that would change my life forever. It was as if I was wandering, lost. I was now connected to my roots and I felt like I was home. I may also want to talk about my search for my Original Birth Certificate. California adoption records are sealed. I petitioned Alameda County Courts 3 times only to be denied. I can't even get them now even though my Birth Family knows me. If my petition had been approved, I would have met my mother, and found myself.
Triad S1E10 Amanda McKinstry: Black Girl, White Family
08-12-2021
Triad S1E10 Amanda McKinstry: Black Girl, White Family
I stared at the big brown envelope sitting on my kitchen counter. After 10 minutes I gingerly gathered it to me and sat down at the dining room table. I cautiously slid out the contents. Five days previously, I had made contact with my birth family for the first time. One of my new sisters had sent me this package. Its contents were as precious to me as pure gold: photographs of birth family spanning over 100 years. As I looked into their faces, something changed within me. I felt a connection that I had never felt until then. Tears bubbled up from deep inside. I looked like these people. I saw my mother's hands. They were identical to mine. I felt like they were mine. This was the reconnection I needed to begin the search to finding myself. That paragraph is definitely personal. The more factual part (although it is all personal!) would be that I was born in Oakland, CA at the Salvation Army hospital for unwed mothers, August 13, 1945. I was relinquished two months later and three months after that I was adopted by a very wonderful family. However, in my mind, January 4, 1946 was the day my life began. I never thought about another mother or what my life was like the days before. But in my unspoken heart, I was feeling a growing sense of dissatisfaction and malaise. I didn't know myself. I very easily felt rejected. I married in 1970 and was very co-dependent most of those years. By 1996, I had no sense of my identity or sense of direction. I needed control. I went to Therapy. I wanted to look at my adoption as a possible reason for the huge hole I was feeling. Fast forward, I began the search for my Birth Mother. I learned from the investigator that my mother, Lucille, had died of cancer in April 1995, but they had located my Birth Family, 3 sisters. On March 12, 2000 I made the call that would change my life forever. It was as if I was wandering, lost. I was now connected to my roots and I felt like I was home. I may also want to talk about my search for my Original Birth Certificate. California adoption records are sealed. I petitioned Alameda County Courts 3 times only to be denied. I can't even get them now even though my Birth Family knows me. If my petition had been approved, I would have met my mother, and found myself.
S1E7 Marcie Keatley: The Shoebox Effect
29-10-2021
S1E7 Marcie Keatley: The Shoebox Effect
My story begins in the fall of 2007 when I rediscover a shoebox in my closet. It lead me back to the ‘70s, my first love and the baby I surrendered to adoption in 1978. What I uncovered, totally transformed my life.My first love and I marry after finding one another after 27 years, search and find our daughter on Father's Day 2008 and she and her children come to live with us and we begin to heal our broken family. The next ten years would prove to be challenging and heartbreaking, as we all come to terms with our loss. In 2017 our story made global news when we legally adopted our daughter, changed her name to her birth name, and terminated her adoption. She was thirty-nine years old. (this was her birthday present!)I harnessed my anger and decided to write my state senator, start my own not for profit., get a bill on the floor for Indiana and advocate for adoption reform. Over the course of nine years, Hoosiers for Equal Access to Records now has access to records for those born from 1941-1993. Our sister organization, Indiana Adoptee Network, our educational non-profit, outgrew its name and is now The National Association of Adoptees and Parents Inc. Today, I am the President of the National Association of Adoptees and Parents and host a Friday night virtual event called Adoption Happy Hour where we elevate the voices of all members of the adoption constellation. Our attendance has gone global and we have an average of 60-75 every Friday night. In addition, I have co-written a children's book, Frankie and Friends Talk Adoption, and am currently working with the amazing Nancy Verrier on a parental guide for adoptive parents.I am also the author of The ShoeBox Effect, Transforming Pain Into Fortitude and Purpose, guiding others on how to unpack loss and find acceptance and peace with the past and was recently appointed to the board of directors for Women's Writes Publishing and Author Services, dedicated to enhancing the societal status of women by providing a platform for the female voice.