Whatchu Know About Restorative Justice?

CCEJ

Welcome to Whatchu Know About RJ? Sharing Stories and Skills about Restorative Justice, a podcast of the California Conference for Equality and Justice. CCEJ is an organization dedicated to eliminating bias, bigotry and racism. This first series was recorded within a year of dialogue, reflection, and play with a team of trainers and practitioners of Restorative Justice working in schools. Restorative Justice is a paradigm and set of practices that center needs and accountability in relationships to impact culture and community. This podcast is dedicated to anyone working in schools or teams, with students or adults. Why should you listen to this podcast? We are all in relationships- where we work, where we live and with ourselves. Listen to know more- whatchu you already know- about how relationships matter. Interested to hear more? Support CCEJ at: https://www.cacej.org/makeadifference/donate/ Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CACEJ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ccejsocal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ccejlove/ Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/La_Inedita/Live_on_WFMUs_Transpacific_Sound_Paradise_with_Rob_Weisberg_April_4_2015/Chicha_Chicha read less
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Episodes

Episode 3: How to ‘unsettle’ myself: Can Restorative Justice help us grapple with Settler Colonialism?
03-02-2021
Episode 3: How to ‘unsettle’ myself: Can Restorative Justice help us grapple with Settler Colonialism?
What is the first thing you do in the morning when you get out of bed? Whose land do you wake up on? What is the history of how the land came to be there for you? As part of our series: Expanding the Breath, expanding Restorative Justice into family, society and workplaces we have a conversation with the Editor and Contributor of Colorizing Restorative Justice: Voicing Our Realties, Dr. Edward C Valandra/ Waŋbli Wapȟáha Hokšíla, about Settler Colonialism- the theft and illegal occupation of Indigenous land and the elimination of Indigenous peoples. Edward shares critical insights about who is a settler, how the near genocide of Indigenous peoples is the United State’s ‘first harm’, and the violent impacts Indigenous peoples continue to experience today. Throughout the conversation, we examine the limitations and strengths of Restorative Justice to effectively engage with Settler Colonialism, and grapple with Edward’s call to all Restorative Justice practitioners to address this ‘first harm’ in order to make the transformative potential of the Restorative Justice movement a reality. We also explore with Edward how non- Indigenous people can come into consciousness of this legacy of this ‘first harm’ by first ‘unsettling’ themselves with strategies and methods such as challenging their own ‘settler fragility’, thoughtfully practicing land acknowledgments and continuing to develop their ability to act against Settler Colonialism. Resources to Learn More: Link to: Anna Soole: “A Resource for Indigenous Solidarity” https://www.annasoole.com/single-post/2018/04/03/decolonization-a-resource-for-indigenous-solidarity Link to Colorizing Restorative Justice book: http://www.livingjusticepress.org/
Episode 2: What do you know about your family? Part 2
13-01-2021
Episode 2: What do you know about your family? Part 2
“Restorative Justice work extends beyond the school.” In our training, CCEJ complicates individual views of trauma by acknowledging the historical roots of trauma in white supremacy, colonization, capitalism, cisheteropatriarchy. Having this deeper view of trauma is especially important for bringing Restorative Justice practices “home” to families of all kinds, a challenging process we get insights on from CCEJ’s Training Specialist, Mayra Serna. We begin this special two-part conversation by examining the power of storytelling within families to name, understand, and begin to heal trauma. Taking three generations of our own families as examples, we explore how systems of power have impacted their values and choices around disciplinary and resilience practices. We do discuss discipline methods within our families, please be advised regarding your own experiences and activations regarding such experiences. We close this first part by inviting listeners to explore their own family narratives through a series of questions to use in their own families. In part two of this series, we examine discipline and school by discussing various trauma and stress responses from school discipline practices, as well as historic uses of such practices. We also examine what questions Restorative Justice asks in connection to discipline. Mayra shares promising practices that incorporate parents and caregivers as leaders and contributors to school culture. Mayra discusses what a powerful support Restorative Justice can be for parent and caregiver communities, and how parents and caregivers are important to the successful implementation of Restorative Justice in schools.
Episode 1: What do you know about your family? Part 1
13-01-2021
Episode 1: What do you know about your family? Part 1
“Restorative Justice work extends beyond the school.” In our training, CCEJ complicates individual views of trauma by acknowledging the historical roots of trauma in white supremacy, colonization, capitalism, cisheteropatriarchy. Having this deeper view of trauma is especially important for bringing Restorative Justice practices “home” to families of all kinds, a challenging process we get insights on from CCEJ’s Training Specialist, Mayra Serna. We begin this special two-part conversation by examining the power of storytelling within families to name, understand, and begin to heal trauma. Taking three generations of our own families as examples, we explore how systems of power have impacted their values and choices around disciplinary and resilience practices. We do discuss discipline methods within our families, please be advised regarding your own experiences and activations regarding such experiences. We close this first part by inviting listeners to explore their own family narratives through a series of questions to use in their own families. In part two of this series, we examine discipline and school by discussing various trauma and stress responses from school discipline practices, as well as historic uses of such practices. We also examine what questions Restorative Justice asks in connection to discipline. Mayra shares promising practices that incorporate parents and caregivers as leaders and contributors to school culture. Mayra discusses what a powerful support Restorative Justice can be for parent and caregiver communities, and how parents and caregivers are important to the successful implementation of Restorative Justice in schools.