Access to Inspiration

Sue Stockdale

Our podcast has as social mission. To encourage you to reflect on the world differently. On how we can all inspire one another. Interviews with people from more than 25 countries who are making an impact. read less
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Episodes

116. Bruce Parker: The opportunity that was too good to be true
3d ago
116. Bruce Parker: The opportunity that was too good to be true
This episode explores the concept of sliding doors moments and emphasises the importance of trusting oneself and finding stillness and clarity in life. Host Sue Stockdale interviews singer and entertainer Bruce Parker. They discuss Bruce's love for soul and Motown music, which he grew up with in Inglewood, Los Angeles. Bruce shares his experiences of touring in China and encountering a dangerous situation with the Chinese triads.About Bruce ParkerBruce Parker is known as The California Soul Man, and has enthralled audiences around the world, working with legendary music icons such as Chaka Khan, Debbie Harry, and Michael Jackson. Connect with Bruce Parker on LinkedIn.Key Quotes "That was my first real experience of having been on stage, and something touched me at that moment, and realising, wow, there's a gift here.""I never graduated. I was just pulled toward this music""We're being treated like royalty. We're given five star hotels. We're being driven around in Mercedes limousines.""I was told, you do what Kobayashi say, or nothing your family or your government ever be able to do to find you"."We were given everything. It was this incredible situation. But having been told that by Kobayashi, I knew we were really, really in trouble"."I call myself a spiritual person. No matter what the situation, The answers are always there""Be still, be quiet, and listen". Time Stamps00:00:13 Sliding doors moments shape us.00:06:01 Following your passion is important.00:13:02 Trapped in China, no escape.00:25:32 Negotiation for freedom in China.00:36:03 Resourcefulness leads to new opportunities.00:38:26 Listen to your inner voice.Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact ReportProducer: Sue Stockdale Sound Editor: Matias De Ezcurra
115. Georgina Bark: Exploring the craft of dry stone walling
14-02-2024
115. Georgina Bark: Exploring the craft of dry stone walling
Sue Stockdale speaks with Georgina Bark, also known as Bo, a dry stone waller. Bo shares her journey of leaving an office job behind to pursue a career outdoors and why she enjoys her work. Bo emphasises that problem-solving is a crucial aspect of her job, both in building walls and repairing them and offers advice to listeners, encouraging them to pursue their passions.Georgina Bark is based in Gloucestershire and an Advanced Certificate holder and member of the Dry Stone Walling Association. Key Quotes"You can use hammer on Cotswold stone and the sandstones and the limestones, but there's no point trying to hammer a big granite boulder because you won't win that battle.""If I come back and drive past in another 10-20 years it should be here unless I've done something catastrophically wrong""It's really satisfying to see people learning, people taking something in. It's nice learning a skill they've maybe never dreamed of doing even and seeing their pride in what they've done at the end of the weekend.""The grants for farmers to repair walls are so low that a lot of farm walls go into disrepair and it's a lot cheaper to put a roll of stock netting round.""Sometimes you get in a bit of a rut with a few stones and that's maybe the time to walk away, play with the dog, go and have a cup of tea."'I'm always learning, always something different, different sites, different scenery, getting to go all around the country, working with different people sometimes, different stones."Time Stamps00:00:20 Traditional craft of dry stone walling.00:05:08 Dry stone walling is a craft that requires hands-on experience and a keen eye for judging and using the available stone.00:10:19 Building dry stone walls sustainably.00:14:40 Opportunities for collaboration in walling.00:23:11 Problem-solving is crucial in wall building.00:24:29 Learning and adapting is key.00:29:30 Follow your passion and do what makes you happy.Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact ReportProducer: Sue Stockdale Sound Editor: Matias De Ezcurra
114.  Aneela Rose: Balancing Powerlifting, Business, and Family
07-02-2024
114. Aneela Rose: Balancing Powerlifting, Business, and Family
Sue Stockdale interviews Aneela Rose, the founder of PR agency Rose Media Group and world and British powerlifting champion. Aneela shares her journey of embracing a growth mindset and how it transformed her life personally and professionally.Learn about Aneela's challenges of balancing work, family, and personal interests, the importance of maintaining a positive mindset, and the value of continual learning and collaboration. Aneela also discusses her achievements in powerlifting, how she has overcome barriers and how it inspires her children and family.About Aneela RoseAneela Rose is the multi-award-winning founder of Sussex PR Agency Rose Media Group and World and British Powerlifting Champion. Inspired by her two children, she adopted a growth mindset, which changed her life, both professionally and personally. Her favourite mantra in business is “To achieve what you have never achieved, you must do what you have never done” and in her sport, “People said girls shouldn’t lift weights, I said - watch this.” Amongst the many accolades Aneela and her agency have won are:Best B2B PR Consultancy in UK, Success in Business Award, Employer of the year Award, Dynamic Asian Business Woman and Asian Achiever Award.Aneela represented Team GB at the World Powerlifting Championships in 2018 and won gold in her class, she won gold again at the ABPU British Championships 2019 and silver at the 2022 British Champs.Connect with Aneela Rose on Linkedin, Website, Twitter Key Quotes "I learned very early on that if you could control your mind, then you are going to win with yourself." "Change the outcome of a situation by approaching it in a different way.""Taking a step back and breathing and thinking about the positive element of the task in hand actually can turn things around towards an upward spiral.""I was told you're better at the strength training than you are the javelin. I think you need to switch sports." "My husband said you can't give up powerlifting because that's who you are and it gives you the mental strength as well as the physical strength to be able to cope with everything else you've got going on in life".Time Stamps[00:07:39] B2B PR agency and clients.[00:11:47] Growth mindset.[00:16:42] Being a world champion.[00:21:18] Overcoming hormonal changes in menopause.[00:23:02] Scheduling and time management.[00:29:40] Switching sports for success.[00:32:29] Female Asian powerlifting barriers.[00:34:50] Age should be no barrier.[00:38:32] Juggling a busy life. Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact ReportProducer: Sue Stockdale Sound Editor: Matias De Ezcurra
113. Elise Wortley: Finding inspiration in nature
18-10-2023
113. Elise Wortley: Finding inspiration in nature
In this episode, Elise Wortley joins Sue Stockdale to discuss her adventure in the Canadian wilderness for the Channel 4 TV show "Alone". She shares her experience being dropped in the middle of nowhere and having to fend for herself in the wild. Elise reflects on the challenges and rewards of immersing herself in nature, including hunting for food and building shelter for the first time. Elise also talks about how reconnecting with nature can have a positive impact on our wellbeing and why she was inspired to start a project to follow in the footsteps of forgotten women adventurers.About Elise WortleyElise Wortley is an adventurer, writer and presenter, on a mission to redefine what it means to be an explorer. Her on-going project, Woman with Altitude, has received widespread media attention and her writing has featured in outlets such as The Guardian and The Telegraph. Elise has presented on primetime BBC TV, is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and recently starred in Channel 4's new adventure series ALONE, becoming runner up in the ultimate test of endurance and ingenuity, in one of the most beautiful but challenging landscapes on earth.Connect with Elise Wortley on website and InstagramKey Quotes“One of the reasons I did Alone was to become fully immersed in nature and to just leave modern day life behind.”“ I decided to take a team of women with me to India because I wanted the trip to show other women that you can go on these adventures.”“ I used to see rain as horrible, but now I realise that it has a place in the ecosystem and I know how it feels to get as wet as the plants.”“ I learned that when I was in nature in the mountains or anywhere, even the park, I felt so much better.”“Nan Shepherd is all about not getting to the top of the mountain and just rushing to summit it, but experiencing it as a whole. The beauty that you can get out of just immersing yourself in nature.”“Sitting, doing nothing, we don't really do that in our normal lives.”“ I've learned to be a lot calmer because in London, everyone's rushing around.”“ I just want to inspire other people to go on adventures and get out there and not necessarily think you have to live by the normal ways.”Time Stamps[00:00:22] Alone in the Canadian wilderness.[00:02:44] Being kind to yourself.[00:05:02] Managing anxiety.[00:11:31] Female explorers and empowering women.[00:14:58] Nan Shepherd and The Living Mountain.[00:19:18] Mental health and work-life balance.[00:22:34] Who or what inspires you?[00:24:04] Women with Altitude.This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact ReportProducer: Sue Stockdale Sound Editor: Matias De Ezcurra
112. Bettina Ovgaard: The wonder of Greenland
11-10-2023
112. Bettina Ovgaard: The wonder of Greenland
Host Sue Stockdale interviews Bettina Ovgaard, a versatile professional who has pursued a career by following her curiosity. Bettina shares her experiences working in various industries, including costume design for film, leading tours in the Arctic, and serving as Chief of Civil-Military Cooperation for Joint Arctic Command.They delve into Bettina's work at the Thule Air Base (now Pituffik Space Base) in Greenland situated near the North Pole, the attraction of the dark season, the challenges and freedoms of remote living, and the unique experiences and personal growth that can come from living in a confined and isolated environment. Finally, Bettina reflects on evolving nature of Greenland, and the importance of networking and building relationships.About Bettina Ovgaard Working on and off in Greenland for 25 years, most recently Bettina has been Chief of Civil Military Cooperation at Joint Arctic Command which is the operational branch of the Danish Defense in the Arctic. From Nov 2023 she begins in a new position as Strategic Advisor at the National Defense Technology Center at Aalborg University Campus in Copenhagen. Connect with Bettina Ovgaard on Facebook and LinkedInKey Quotes"I find it fascinating that nature is this unforgivable force and makes us very small.""The thing about Greenland that I love is the people and nature and how they mix."What I really like to do in my professional life is startups. I love to do something from scratch because I can develop it together with other people.""For me, variation is the spice of life.""Nothing about us, without us, means that Greenland does not want to be exploited. Greenland wants to be a part of what is going on in its future."Time Stamps[00:04:05] Fascination with Greenland's culture.[00:05:07] Choosing a career path.[00:11:13] Living on Thule Air Base.[00:13:42] Freedom and confinement in Greenland.[00:21:44] Civil-military cooperation in Greenland.[00:28:25] Embracing curiosity and variation.[00:31:06] Greenland's self-assertion and global role.This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact ReportCredits:Sound Editor - Matias de Ezcurra, Producer - Sue Stockdale
111. Paulo Savaget: Unlocking potential where others see scarcity
04-10-2023
111. Paulo Savaget: Unlocking potential where others see scarcity
Have you ever come up against rules, procedures, or obstacles that make it incredibly difficult to create change? This week's guest shares some brilliant examples of organisations that have successfully overcome these challenges.Sue Stockdale interviews Paolo Savaget, Associate Professor at Oxford University, about his work in transforming unjust systems through workarounds and entrepreneurship. He shares inspiring examples of organisations in Zambia and the Netherlands that have successfully created change despite rules and obstacles. Paolo's work centres around finding loopholes and roundabouts within existing systems. He explains how piggybacking on other organisations or aspects of the system can help spread ideas and messages more widely.Paulo Savaget, author of The Four Workarounds, is an associate professor at Oxford University’s Engineering Sciences Department and the Saïd Business School. He holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge as a Gates Scholar and has a background working as a lecturer, consultant, entrepreneur, and researcher finding innovative solutions for a more inclusive world. As a consultant, he worked on projects for large companies, non-profits, government agencies in Latin America, and the OECD. He currently resides in Oxford, UK. Connect with Paulo Savaget at Oxford University : Website : LinkedInTime Stamps[00:00:37] Transforming unjust systems through workarounds.[00:03:58] Potential in overlooked places.[00:08:05] Hackers and their approach.[00:11:52] Life-saving medicines in remote areas.[00:17:12] Loopholes in rules.[00:19:00] Applying Dutch legislation in Poland.[00:23:08] Workarounds and empowerment.[00:26:48] Learning from others and serendipity.Key Quotes"I started seeing more potentiality in places that people only see scarcity.""I know very little about computer hackers, but they seem to make change so quickly and resourcefully in very complex computer systems."“After studying many cases around the world, addressing different kinds of sustainability problems, I identified the four workarounds that are very unconventional.""Most of my research ideas didn't come out of time that I spent just thinking. It's actually from others.""Complicated solutions are not very good in complex situations - simple solutions are good in complex situations".This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact Report
110. Dr. Poornima Luthra: Demonstrating active allyship
27-09-2023
110. Dr. Poornima Luthra: Demonstrating active allyship
In episode 110, host Sue Stockdale interviews Dr Poornima Luthra, an associate professor at Copenhagen Business School. They explore the concept of active allyship and discuss ways to overcome the fear of saying or doing the wrong thing when supporting diversity and inclusion within organizations.Poornima is the founder and CEO of TalentED Consultancy ApS. Poornima’s work in DEI focuses on expanding the dimensions of diversity we address with an emphasis on intersectionality, empowering individuals to be active allies of inclusion and enabling inclusive leadership.She has been recognised as one of the world’s 30 up-and-coming thinkers whose ideas will make an important impact on management thinking in the future by the prestigious Thinkers50.Her book ‘The Art of Active Allyship’ was named one of the 10 best management books of 2023 by Thinkers50. Poornima is also the recipient of the Professional Women of Colour Denmark 2021 Impact award, and the national winner (Denmark) in the Trailblazer category of the 2023 Nordic Blaze Inclusion Awards Nordic Blaze Inclusion Awards.She is currently co-authoring her third book in the DEI space titled ‘Leading through Bias’ which will be published in November 2023 with the Danish version of the book being published by the Danish publisher Djøf in 2024.Connect with Poornima Luthra via her website : LinkedIn : Facebook Time Stamps[00:01:09] Squiggly career paths.[00:03:31] Microaggressions and gender biases.[00:07:32] Inclusion and diversity interests.[00:10:32] DEI as a zero-sum game.[00:13:54] Fear in diversity and inclusion.[00:18:35] Allyship and its definition.[00:22:19] Progress in active allyship.[00:25:47] LGBTQ+ community acceptance.[00:27:45] Addressing fear and inequality.Key Quotes"I really liked the idea of understanding human beings and the workplace environment.""I went to the program director and said, I'd really like to be considered for this role. And he looked at me and said, not until you've got a lot more white hair"."Fear is a topic that we really need to put on the table."When we look at diversity as a zero-sum game, that it's one group against another, we actually do more harm.""Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood.""Allyship is a lifelong process of building supporting relationships with people who are from underrepresented, marginalised, discriminated groups."This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact Report
109. Monica Parker: Exploring the power of awe and wonder
20-09-2023
109. Monica Parker: Exploring the power of awe and wonder
Slowing down and engaging in activities that quiet the brain can bring more wonder into our lives. Monica Parker talks to host, Sue Stockdale about how practicing mindfulness and being observant allows us to cultivate a slower thought process, which is essential for experiencing wonder. Additionally, exposing ourselves to new ideas, new perspectives, and new environments can also stimulate wonder by breaking our routines and allowing our minds to notice novelty. Monica suggests that we don't have to wait for extraordinary moments or visit extraordinary places to experience wonder and awe. Instead, we can find it in the ordinary, in the simple things in our lives.Appreciating things like sunsets, the beauty of autumn leaves, or small details can bring a smile to our faces and evoke a sense of wonder, and enhance our overall sense of happiness and fulfilment. Overall, the episode highlights the importance of curiosity, both about the world and ourselves, in fostering personal growth and self-acceptance.About Monica Parker Monica Parker is the author of the Wall Street Journal bestseller The Power of Wonder and a world-renowned speaker, writer, and authority on the future of work. Parker has spent decades helping people discover how to lead and live wonderfully. The founder of global human analytics and change consultancy HATCH, whose clients include blue-chip companies such as LinkedIn, Google, Prudential, and LEGO, Parker challenges corporate systems to advocate for more meaningful work lives. In addition to her extensive advocacy work, Parker has been an opera singer, a museum exhibition designer, a policy director, and a homicide investigator defending death row inmates. A lover of the arts, literature, and Mexican food, Parker and her family split their time between Atlanta, London, and Nice. Her wonderbringers include travel, time spent with friends, and live music.Connect with Monica Parker on her website : LinkedIn : X : InstagramTimeStamps[00:03:07] Finding wonder in prison.[00:06:09] The benefits of wonder.[00:07:03] Slowing down for wonder.[00:13:41] The power of mixed emotions.[00:15:54] The role of inspiration in wonder.[00:19:38] Redefining the work environment.[00:21:00] Silver linings in dark times.[00:24:28] The Power of Wonder.This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact Report
108. Kevin Chapman: Discovering our physical intelligence
13-09-2023
108. Kevin Chapman: Discovering our physical intelligence
In this episode, host Sue Stockdale welcomes Kevin Chapman, co-founder of the Physical Intelligence Institute. Kevin shares his passion for helping people perform at their best by understanding and utilizing the full potential of their bodies. He introduces the concept of physical intelligence and explores how our bodies can impact our confidence and anxiety levels. Through science and practical applications, Kevin empowers listeners to optimise their performance and achieve their desired outcomes.About Kevin Chapman Kevin Chapman is a highly experienced coach, consultant, trainer, communication specialist and business leader. As managing director of RADA Business, Kevin built a market-leading performance brand in communication training and leadership impact, growing the business substantially over 5 years. This work included developing pioneering training for women in multiple countries to build confidence and presence at work. Kevin holds a degree in Mathematical Statistics and Operations Research from Exeter University, an MBA and is a qualified coach. He is also a Trustee of the Comedy School and supporter of The Forgiveness Project.Connect with Kevin Chapman via Website : LinkedInKey Quotes"You can release serotonin by twisting at the waist.""Internal chemistry has a direct impact on our mood.""If we create a fist and push that against our hand, we'll actually generate more testosterone in our system and we may feel that we have a higher level of risk tolerance, which may help us to speak up.""Doing something like pace breathing over three months, apart from reducing levels of stress, can improve our cognitive function by 62%."Time Stamps[00:02:29] Using the body for confidence.[00:07:39] Embodied training in drama schools.[00:11:20] Flexibility in adapting communication.[00:14:06] The world of embodiment.[00:17:48] Serotonin and gut chemistry.[00:21:22] Performance practices for virtual meetings.[00:26:00] Managing stress and burnout.[00:28:22] Physical Intelligence InstituteThis series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Connect with Access to Inspiration: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter | Read our Impact Report
107. Gary Fildes: Being inspired by dark skies and stars
06-09-2023
107. Gary Fildes: Being inspired by dark skies and stars
In episode 107 of the Access to Inspiration podcast, host Sue Stockdale interviews Gary Fildes, an astronomer and the founder of the Keilder Observatory in the UK. Gary's passion for astronomy and his encyclopedic knowledge of the subject have contributed to the success of the observatories he has worked at. They discuss the distinction between being an astronomer and an astrophysicist and how Gary's interest in astronomy was sparked by childhood experiences with a telescope and seeing the Milky Way. Gary reflects on his journey to making astronomy his career and the challenges he faced in a working-class environment that didn't prioritize science.About Gary FildesGary Fildes is an outreach astronomer, specialising in public engagement centres in astronomy. Fildes is the Founder and ex - CEO Lead Astronomer of the Kielder Observatory in the UK and is currently lead Astronomer at the Grassholme Observatory which he also founded. An author and with numerous TV and media appearances under his belt. Fildes has firmly established himself as a leading light in the UK astronomy scene. Gary’s experience and knowledge in the development of accessible, exciting and inspiring astronomy centres is unparalleled.In recognition of Gary’s achievements, he was awarded an honorary MSc degree in Astrophysics from Durham University in 2012. Then in 2017 he was also awarded an honorary degree from the University of Sunderland. He has presented on BBC TV and many radio shows. It is widely acknowledged that these observatories success is due to Gary’s ability to communicate his passion, enthusiasm and encyclopaedic knowledge of astronomy to all who want to listen.In July 2016, Gary published his first book ‘An Astronomers Tale’ a bricklayers guide to the Galaxy.Connect with Gary Fildes via Website : Twitter : YouTube : Facebook : LinkedInTime Stamps00:33 Passion for astronomy leads career.09:09 Passion and determination lead to success.10:08 Importance of astronomy for society.14:04 Inspiration and passion through astronomy.19:09 Preserving dark skies is crucial.23:26 Passion for astronomy fuels education.27:53 Passion and enthusiasm are infectious.Key Quotes"Astronomy is the source of everything, the foundation of our understanding of the universe." "Astronomy is not just a job for science, but also for philosophy and religion, as it explores the true nature of reality." "Astronomy saved my life and gave me purpose. It is a passion that fuels my every day." "Dark skies are a human right, and preserving them is essential for our connection to the universe." "The observatories I have built are my contribution to inspiring and educating others about the wonders of astronomy." "The universe is a vast and interconnected system, from the tiniest particles to the largest galaxies." "Stargazing collectively allows us to share our experiences and deepen our understanding of the universe." "Astronomy is an accessible, holistic, natural resource that should be embraced by all." "The curiosity and passion for astronomy should be nurtured in young minds, as it can inspire future innovators." This series is kindly supported by Squadcast by Descript –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Read the transcription for this episode on www.accesstoinspiration.org and connect with us:Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter Read our Impact Report Sound Editor: Matias de Ezcurra (he/him)Producer: Sue Stockdale (she/her)
106. Bertrand Piccard: Combining science and adventure to tackle climate challenges
19-07-2023
106. Bertrand Piccard: Combining science and adventure to tackle climate challenges
In today's world, the term "ecology" often evokes images of sacrifice, expense, and inconvenience. In this final episode of our Climate Solutions series, renowned explorer and environmentalist, Bertrand Piccard explains why focusing on ecology is not only profitable but also exciting.Piccard is best known for his groundbreaking achievements in exploration: flying around the world in a solar-powered airplane and circumnavigating the globe in a hot air balloon. These adventures allowed him to witness the beauty and fragility of our planet firsthand, instilling in him a deep sense of responsibility to protect and preserve it. Talking to host, Sue Stockdale, who is also an explorer, Bertrand discusses the importance of giving ourselves permission to invent our future, highlighting how we are often trained to remain in our zone of comfort, which ultimately limits our potential for adventure and growth. He emphasises the need to step outside of our certainties and embrace the unknown in order to create the life and society we want and shape the future we desire.About Bertrand Piccard : Clean Tech Pioneer- Founder and President of the Solar Impulse FoundationBertrand Piccard is a pioneering spirit and an influential voice to encourage the implementation of efficient solutions. As one of the first, as early as the 2000s, to consider ecology from a profitability perspective, Bertrand Piccard is considered an opinion leader on the themes of innovation and sustainability. As President of the Solar Impulse Foundation, he promotes qualitative growth by demonstrating the economic potential of clean technologies. Denouncing the absurdity of the polluting and inefficient systems still too often used today, he pleads for the modernization of the legal framework in order to facilitate market access for efficient solutions. His voice is heard within the most important institutions, such as the United Nations, the European Commission, the World Economic Forum and his commitment has earned him several nominations, such as Champion of the Earth, and Goodwill Ambassador of the United Nations.Connect with Bertrand Piccard via Twitter @bertrandpiccard and @solarimpulse and the Solar Impulse websiteKey QuotesI was born and raised into that vision of running scientific expeditions to protect the environment.It’s wrong to say the sky is the limit. The real limit is the fuel.I wanted to identify in the world all the efficient solutions that are economically profitable to be able to protect the environment.We explore with my foundation, the best solutions, we explore new ways to make them known, we explore new ways to implement them, to create an enthusiasm around these solutions.Ecology is not anymore something expensive, boring and sacrificial. It is something exciting. It is something economically profitable. It's something that can bring people together.You have to give an incentive to people to change.If you see somebody who is afraid of changing, you have to show him that he has inside of himself all the tools, all the resources, all the potentials that can help him to do something differently. We have to show him that it's better to do it in another way.There was a time in exploration when it was new continents, then it was new planets. Now it's really how to live better on this planet, how to protect our planet, how to improve the quality of life, how to find new solutions.When we speak of solutions, it's important to understand that most of the time it's not high-tech solutions, it's common sense.Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with us on Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn : Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series Credits:Sound Editor: Matias de EzcurraProducer: Sue Stockdale
105. Professor Dame Anne Glover: The importance of communication in science
12-07-2023
105. Professor Dame Anne Glover: The importance of communication in science
In this episode of our podcast, host Sue Stockdale talks to Professor Dame Anne Glover, President of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. Anne emphasizes the importance of effective communication in science and geography. Whether it's encouraging more people to pursue science or communicating the importance of research findings, clear and effective communication is essential.With Climate Solutions as the theme of this podcast series, Anne shares her thoughts on how the data generated from understanding the current climate situation can be used to generate solutions and highlights the importance of taking responsibility and finding pleasure in the knowledge gained from research. Finally, Anne reflects on the importance of representation and inspiring others, particularly young women, to pursue their passions and overcome barriers.About Professor Dame Anne GloverProfessor Dame Anne Glover PRSE FRS is a molecular biologist who has studied how we respond to stress at the molecular level and is currently Special Adviser to the Principal at University of Strathclyde. She was the first Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission (2012-2015) and is a well respected ambassador for European science with deep experience of evidence-based policymaking.Prior to that, Anne was the first Chief Scientific Adviser for Scotland (2006-2011) and has worked to increase diversity in both science and in society as well as ensuring that knowledge generated from research can be made useful.In 1999 Anne spun out a company from her research to both diagnose and provide solutions for environmental pollution.She is/has been a trustee and Chair of a number of charities and has a particular interest in how knowledge can be used to transform lives in Africa and developing nations.Anne also serves on a number of Boards in the UK with a common theme of harnessing innovation for sustainability and health. She has been awarded over 20 honorary degrees and fellowships both nationally and internationally and appears regularly in the media and at science festivals.Find out more about Professor Dame Anne Glover via University of Strathclyde and Wikipedia and TwitterKey Quotes"Excitement is a life in science.""People think sometimes that science is a value-free zone. It's just absolutely all about evidence and data. And of course, that's not true.""I think the most important thing is to be outward looking.""I think scientists are pretty good communicators.""I think it's inexcusable to take public money to do research, and not to think about how do you make sure that the knowledge that you generate has impact and is valuable to other people." Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with us on Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn : Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series on Friday 21st July from 1300 to 1345hrs BST.Credits:Sound Editor: Matias de EzcurraProducer: Sue Stockdale
104. Roisin Hyde: Reducing the environmental impact of concrete
05-07-2023
104. Roisin Hyde: Reducing the environmental impact of concrete
Concrete is one of the most widely used building materials in the world, with one third of global resources going into its production. However, the production of concrete has a significant impact on the environment, and there is a growing need for sustainable alternatives.Host Sue Stockdale interviews Roisin Hyde, a chartered architect specialising in sustainable design and 3D printing of low carbon concrete components as concrete alternatives. Her business, Nomad, has recently been nominated for the EarthShot prize, which supports start-up companies working in the area of habitat restoration and decarbonization. Her goal is to decarbonize the construction industry through her work with concrete. About Roisin HydeRoisin Hyde is a Chartered Architect specialising in Sustainable Design with a PhD in Parametric Design, Novel Materials and Digital Fabrication. She spent 5 years developing, testing and validating a sustainable model for the 3d Printing low carbon concrete components as a PhD Student in Queen’s and Fulbright Visiting Researcher at UNC. In 2001 Roisin was awarded Startup funding through Innovate UK's ICURe program for the production of 3D printed low carbon concrete components made with industrial by-product and waste materials. Roisin is currently working with partners Balfour Beatty, FP McCann and Enva to produce 3DP concrete seating, planters and paving made with recycled glass from the Palm House of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh as art of the current restoration works.Connect with Roisin Hyde on LinkedIn and via her website, or watch her TED Talk. Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with us on Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn : Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series on Friday 21st July from 1300 to 1345hrs BST.Key Quotes "I think one third of global resources goes into the production of concrete." "The technology is already 20 years ahead of the industry" "Geopolymer it's really a super material like carbon fibre or carbon nanotubes or graphene, it's a pretty incredible material""I think it's really important to connect with young people and say this is your planet.""It would be great to develop a wonderful circular economy for the moon and we can start over on a planet and do it right from from day one""I just feel that it has great potential for creating more equal society globally. People will be able to access this technology wherever they are and we'll be able to share our knowledge bigger communities and have more impact in mitigating against climate change"Credits:Sound Editor: Matias de EzcurraProducer: Sue Stockdale
103. Iain Stewart: Empowering communities to adapt to climate change
28-06-2023
103. Iain Stewart: Empowering communities to adapt to climate change
In this episode, Iain Stewart, an expert in geoscience and sustainability, highlights the need for the scientific community to communicate differently to engage communities in developing sustainable climate solutions, learning to move away from the 'tell and sell' approach, to one of 'sense and respond' in order to build trust.Iain explains to host, Sue Stockdale about his latest project in northeastern Jordan, where a wetland has dried up due to climate change, and what he has learned in getting the project off the ground in the desert landscape.About Iain StewartIain Stewart is the El Hassan bin Talal Research Chair in Sustainability at the Royal Scientific Society (Jordan) and Professor of Geoscience Communication at the University of Plymouth (UK). The founding director of the University of Plymouth’s ‘Sustainable Earth Institute’, Iain’s long-standing research interests are in disaster risk reduction, climate change, and Earth science communication.His Earth science communication work has built on a 15-year partnership with BBC Science television presenting popular documentary series, such as ‘Earth: The Power of the Planet’, ‘Earth: The Climate Wars’, ‘How Earth Made Us’, ‘How To Grow A Planet’, ‘The Rise of the Continents’ and ‘Planet Oil'.Iain was also academic advisor on David Attenborough's acclaimed BBC series ‘Seven Worlds, One Planet’. Awarded an MBE for his services to geography and geology education, he was President of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, was the Communications Lead and Evidence Chair for the Scottish Government's Climate Citizen's Assembly, and is the UNESCO Chair for Geoscience and Society.Connect with Iain Stewart on Twitter and find out more at the Royal Scientific Society (Jordan).Key Quotes"Water scarcity is the number one problem here in Jordan. And I think you can't really be a geoscientist working on sustainability here and not have a project on that.""One of the solutions is empowering communities to be able to make their own adaptations.""To be able to cope with the effects of climate change I think adaptability and flexibility will be absolutely the key""Authentic listening, where you're genuinely shutting up, is something that scientists and experts don't do very well.""Some people would argue from a sustainability perspective that we should effectively stop traveling.""The worst people for traveling in terms of flights are academics and the worst academics are climate scientists.""We need to show leadership here. We need to show the motivation, the sense of purpose to be doing this.""One of the unpalatable messages is that the low carbon green energy economy is going to need more stuff. And that stuff is going to have to come from somewhere, and the place it's going to come from is the ground. And therefore, a future with less carbon in it is a future that's going to have a lot more mining in it."Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with us on Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn : Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series on Friday 21st July from 1300 to 1345hrs BST.Credits:Sound Editor: Matias de EzcurraProducer: Sue Stockdale
102. Jojo Mehta: Making change through policy and law
21-06-2023
102. Jojo Mehta: Making change through policy and law
Sue Stockdale interviews Jojo Mehta, the co-founder and executive director of Stop Ecocide International who talks about the organisations mission of advocating for the criminalisation of ecocide and make the destruction of nature a global crime.Jojo Mehta co-founded Stop Ecocide in 2017, alongside barrister and legal pioneer the late Polly Higgins, to support the establishment of ecocide as a crime at the International Criminal Court. The core work to make ecocide an international crime at the international criminal court, is supported and progressed by a large network of over 45 teams and associate groups globally. There are over 50,000 endorsing signatories across civil society and faith groups, and a growing number of endorsing businesses and organisations.Jojo is Chair of the charitable Stop Ecocide Foundation and convenor of the Independent Expert Panel for the Legal Definition of Ecocide chaired by Philippe Sands QC and Dior Fall Sow. She is a graduate of Oxford and London universities and has a background in communications, entrepreneurship and environmental campaigning.Connect with JoJo Mehta on Linked In and Twitter and the Stop Ecocide Campaign Key Quotes"Ecocide is making mass destruction of nature a crime at the international level."“So it's literally to kill one's home."“What I think is so important is that people need to see hope.""I don't know anyone that has got into kind of making change in the world or activism in any way without it beginning in some form with outrage.""I think it's that combination of what is the thing you're outraged about and what is the thing you love doing and how do you put those together?"“We've had agricultural companies say to us that we don't necessarily tick all our regulatory boxes because we know nobody's checking and it's cheaper not to."Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with Access to Inspiration via Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn :Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series on Friday 21st July from 1300 to 1345hrs BST.
101. Mike Robinson: Collaborating for climate solutions
14-06-2023
101. Mike Robinson: Collaborating for climate solutions
Sue Stockdale talks to Mike Robinson, Chief Executive of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society (RSGS) about his adventurous and philanthropic background, and how experience on an expedition to Borneo inspired him to give back to the environment. Mike also describes his work at the Royal Scottish Geographical Society, its function as a small charity, and how he believes that it is not enough for the charity to just inform and influence things, the organisation needs to inspire people that it is possible to change and create solutions that are appealing and ambitious.Mike has been Chief Executive since 2008 and during that time Mike has been instrumental in informing policy through joined-up, collaborative action, particularly in sustainability and climate change. In 2006 he established Stop Climate Chaos Scotland (SCCS), the largest coalition ever formed in Scotland, which was so instrumental in delivering the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009, the Scottish Climate Justice Fund, and the 2019 Emissions Reduction Targets Act. He is an advisor to Government and trustee on several boards, mostly in the spheres of education, agriculture and transport, and is hosting a series of Climate Emergency Summits with more than 40 organisations to identify suitable responses to the emergency, and to inform government thinking.He is an Honorary Fellow of Scottish Environment Link and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS), and has won a number of awards for his contribution to climate change, including the 2001 Best Renewable Energy Initiative, the 2009 Glenfiddich Spirit of Scotland Award for the Environment, and the 2017 Bernier Medal of the RCGS.Connect with Mike Robinson on LinkedIn and Twitter and via the RSGS website Key Quotes "Felix could name every plant in the rainforest and had something to do with every plant. Everything had a use and he knew all of it and it was absolutely inspiring.""It's possible to change""One of the great joys in my role is I think we're focused on the best of people" "You need scale, so whatever you do- it could always be bigger, it could always be better, it could always be more""I am most proud of Scotland's climate change leadership""Ambition is not meant to be achievable - because an ambition that's achievable isn't ambition.""I believe that if everybody understood what I know they'd probably want to do something about climate change."Partners and SupportersWe partnered with the Royal Scottish Geographical Society to bring you this series. Take a look at their Climate Solutions course, developed by leaders and experts in climate change and endorsed by the Institute of Directors.We are also supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations.Connect with Access to Inspiration via Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn :Read our Impact ReportActions to take after listening to the podcastWe have created a list of questions to help you reflect on the podcast episode and what you heardSign up for our Zoom listener discussion on the topics raised in this series on Friday 21st July from 1300 to 1345hrs BST.Credits:Sound Editor: Matias de EzcurraProducer: Sue Stockdale
100. Simeon Wood: Music makes you feel good
10-05-2023
100. Simeon Wood: Music makes you feel good
Sue Stockdale welcomes Simeon Wood, a multi-talented musician, educator, and composer, to celebrate the Access to Inspiration podcast's 100th episode. Simeon shares tales of his 30-year journey as a guest entertainer perfoming all over the world in concert halls, on cruise ships, and even in a prison.Simeon describes his two homemade instruments - the walking stick flute and the bicycle pump - and explains why he believes humor and communication are integral to forming a meaningful connection with his audience. At the end of the podcast, listeners are treated to a recording of one of his tracks from his latest album, Feeling Good. Simeon was born in Huddersfield, England and started playing the flute at the age of 8. He studied at the Trinity College of Music, London, was where his performance and writing skills were honed. When he's not touring Simeon is regularly commissioned to write music for television and theatre productions and has appeared on Britain's Got Talent, the BBC’s One Show and the Chris Evans Breakfast show.Connect with Simeon Wood at his website : Facebook: LinkedIn; Spotify Timestamps:[00:03:11] The importance of humour in music[00:07:51] Inspiration to learn flute.[00:11:38] Practicing like a professional. [00:22:16] Inspiring children with music.[00:26:06] Bringing families together.[00:29:36] Bringing joy to prisoners.[00:33:53] Listen to 'Feeling Good'.Key Quotes:The first instrument that I invented was the walking stick flute.I think humour breaks down a lot of barriers, as does music.It's important that you understand that as an entertainer, that you're not just performing at people, but you're performing with people.I had a teacher that said the difference between a professional and an amateur is that the amateur will practice something until they get it right. A professional will practice something until they can't get it wrong.People give me a lot of inspiration. Kindness of people. The emotions that I see in people's faces, inspires me to write because I want to capture it.Words speak a particular message, but music speaks a different language.I want people to be happier and, take them away from some of the difficulties in life.This series is kindly supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Read the transcription for this episode on www.accesstoinspiration.org and connect with us:Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter Read our Impact Report Sound Editor: Matias de Ezcurra (he/him)Producer: Sue Stockdale (she/her)
99. Vic Ferrari: From Bronx kid to NYPD Detective
03-05-2023
99. Vic Ferrari: From Bronx kid to NYPD Detective
Who would have thought that a Bronx-born rookie cop would go on to become a successful author, giving readers an intimate look into the world of law enforcement? In conversation with host Sue Stockdale, Vic Ferrari talks about the powerful connection between his deep love for the NYPD and his mission to share his experiences through his writing. Growing up in the Bronx, Vic always dreamt of becoming a police officer, and he eventually achieved that goal at the age of 21. Throughout his 20-year career, Vic worked in various precincts and specialized units, honing his skills in understanding the complexities of the street and the people within it. With a wealth of knowledge and a penchant for storytelling, Vic transitioned to the world of writing, bringing readers an authentic and intriguing look at the life of an NYPD officer.To find out more about Vic Ferrari’s book on Amazon Connect with Vic Ferrari on Twitter and Instagram Key QuotesField training was not like the movies where you're crashing up cars or getting into gun fights.There's a lot of consequences for your actions.My books are a behind-the-scenes look of what goes on in different precincts and specialised units. We went down to the morgue, and it looked like a mechanic shop. There was eight bays and a bunch of people working on bodies. Becoming a member of the New York City Police Department for me was like the highlight of my life. When I got into writing these books, I knew a nothing about writing, and nothing about the publishing process or how to get the book to market. If you're a first-time writer and you're not skilled, you didn't take a lot of courses - never write in chronological order. It will paralyze you. If you have writer's block, stop writing, call up your friend, or somebody that you know you could talk to and say, I want to tell you a story and tell that story. This series is kindly supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Read the transcription for this episode on www.accesstoinspiration.org and connect with us:Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter Read our Impact Report
98. Berit Lewis: Thriving after 50
26-04-2023
98. Berit Lewis: Thriving after 50
In episode 98, Berit Lewis shares her personal story of how she arrived at her area of interest in helping people over 50 in their later years of life. Berit talks about how she found a passion for psychology, mindfulness and learning to regulate her physical sensations as a way to manage her thoughts and emotions. This theme of primary and secondary suffering is also brought up, with Berit suggesting that our caveman brains naturally try to keep us safe but not thrive.Berit Lewis is the owner of Thriving Life, offering workshops, courses and retreats in mental well-being. As well as being an experienced and accredited Mindfulness Teacher, she holds a BA (Honours) in Psychology, a MSc in Vitality and Ageing and a MA in Communication and has carried out Mindfulness Based Vitality & Ageing research in cooperation with Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC) and Leyden Academy of Vitality and Ageing in the Netherlands. Berit is Danish and lives in the Netherlands with her Welsh husband and two teenagers.Connect with Berit Lewis on LinkedIn : Facebook :Blog and Newsletter on Substack: Ageing UpwardsBook: Ageing Upwards – a mindfulness-based Framework for the Longevity Revolution Key QuotesI would describe mindfulness in one word - awareness.Research shows that we do tend to become much more mindful when we get older. I see it as a physical sensation that is feeding into a thought that is feeding into emotions.It's that awareness about how we are controlled by our innate genetic wiring in order to keep us safe, and that's not always good for our wellbeing.I've always had a passion for learning.Instead of being the emotion, or the thought, it's about stepping back and saying, I'm having the thought - that it's a passing thing that comes and goes and not get caught up in it.We are so much in our heads. I think it's very important that we take pauses to step back and just notice what's going on.This series is kindly supported by Squadcast –the remote recording platform which empowers podcasters by capturing high-quality audio and video conversations. Find out more at squadcast.fm Read the transcription for this episode on www.accesstoinspiration.org and connect with us:Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : LinkedIn Sign up for our newsletter Read our Impact Report Sound Editor: Matias de Ezcurra (he/him)Producer: Sue Stockdale (she/her)