The J Word: A Podcast by Journalism Practice

Robert (Ted) Gutsche Jr.

What is journalism? How can we make it better? What does "better" look like? We talk about some of these questions -- and answer them -- in our discussions with academics and professionals who've published recently in Journalism Practice. We focus on meanings of advancing digital technologies in journalism, social issues and conditions that journalists (need to) cover, and the future of the field. Articles featured in the episodes are temporarily made free access for citizens, journalists, scholars, and students. While the discussions are rooted in research, they are approached to influence practice. The podcast is hosted and produced by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr., a former journalist, Associate Editor at Journalism Practice, an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Critical Digital Media Practice at Lancaster University in the U.K. and Visiting Professor at Vytautas Magnus University in Lithuania. Follow him on Twitter @RobertGutscheJr and the podcast @JournPractice or email us with ideas and feedback at jwordpodcast@gmail.com.

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The J Word 5.1: Futures in Digital News Tech
08-08-2022
The J Word 5.1: Futures in Digital News Tech
It’s almost impossible to separate today's journalism from technology. In this episode, we hear from Sadia Jamil, incoming faculty at School of International Communications, University of Nottingham, China, who gives us an update on all things journalism and AI. Specifically, she discusses her recent article from Journalism Practice related to evolving newsrooms and a second level of the digital divide in Pakistan. Our second guest, Scott Brennen, shares with us his thoughts on how journalists are dealing with new digital opportunities – and divides – in his coauthored piece that looks at journalistic approaches to new tech in the U.K. Scott is now Head of Online Expression Policy at the Center on Technology Policy at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, in the U.S. At the time of the study he discusses, he was at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and the Oxford Internet Institute, both at the University of Oxford in the U.K. These interviews were recorded separately.Text Featured in this Episode:Brennen, J. S., Howard, P. N., & Nielsen, R. K. (2021). Balancing product reviews, traffic targets, and industry criticism: UK technology journalism in practice. Journalism Practice, 15(10), 1479-1496.Jamil, S. (2022). Evolving newsrooms and the second level of digital divide: Implications for journalistic practice in Pakistan. Journalism Practice, 1-18.  Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr. Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 5.1: Futures in Digital News Tech
08-08-2022
The J Word 5.1: Futures in Digital News Tech
It’s almost impossible to separate today's journalism from technology. In this episode, we hear from Sadia Jamil, incoming faculty at School of International Communications, University of Nottingham, China, who gives us an update on all things journalism and AI. Specifically, she discusses her recent article from Journalism Practice related to evolving newsrooms and a second level of the digital divide in Pakistan. Our second guest, Scott Brennen, shares with us his thoughts on how journalists are dealing with new digital opportunities – and divides – in his coauthored piece that looks at journalistic approaches to new tech in the U.K. Scott is now Head of Online Expression Policy at the Center on Technology Policy at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, in the U.S. At the time of the study he discusses, he was at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and the Oxford Internet Institute, both at the University of Oxford in the U.K. These interviews were recorded separately.Text Featured in this Episode:Brennen, J. S., Howard, P. N., & Nielsen, R. K. (2021). Balancing product reviews, traffic targets, and industry criticism: UK technology journalism in practice. Journalism Practice, 15(10), 1479-1496.Jamil, S. (2022). Evolving newsrooms and the second level of digital divide: Implications for journalistic practice in Pakistan. Journalism Practice, 1-18.  Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr. Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.01: "Reading" Journalistic Power
20-06-2022
The J Word 4.01: "Reading" Journalistic Power
This is the first of two bonus episodes in Season 4 of The J Word. Because practice and scholarship, global communication, and inclusivity are central to what the podcast is about, we decided to help support an award for early career scholars as part of the annual Social Justice + Media Symposium ( that is done each year in memory of Dr. Moses Shumow. This episode features two of the award’s honorable mentions.Mimi Perreault is an Assistant Professor in media and journalism at East Tennessee State University, in the U.S. On this episode, she discusses the methodological and philosophical means by which she holds journalists to their own words through their metajournalistic discourse that fulfills a large sector of the spirit of this award to recognize the role of language to either oppress or to support communities.And, Pablo Martínez-Zárate at La Universidad Iberoamericana Mexico, in Mexico, discusses a type of manifesto he’s created to articulate layers of meanings of archives and images, histories and meanings of montage, from theatre to film to architecture. This is also important to journalism and the types of layered ways in which reporting and its artifacts are built, dissected, and reapplied throughout popular meanings.  Resources Discussed in this EpisodeOverlooked in AppalachiaForensic Landscapes Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.8: Combatting Digital News Threats
09-05-2022
The J Word 4.8: Combatting Digital News Threats
For better or worse, digital technologies, with their offerings of platforms and personalities, have threatened traditional news media outlets in terms of their hold on authority, legitimacy, and money. Decades into this battle over digital terrain, our guests today discuss the continued challenges to online media of all types and focus on what’s been working – and what hasn’t – for new and old news media players.Stefanie Silveira Professor in the Journalism Department at Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, in Brazil, talks with us about a new wave of start-up digital news businesses in her country that are bringing new voices but are maybe not following traditional journalistic approaches to the news. From Hong Kong, Mistura Salaudeen, who has just completed her Ph.D. in the School of Communication and Film at Hong Kong Baptist University, discusses how mainstream journalists continue to delegitimize citizen journalism and how that form, particularly in Nigeria, is struggling for credibility. Lastly, Gregory Gondwe, an Assistant Professor in Communication Studies at California State University-San Bernardino, in the U.S., shares his work on conflicting sides of the story related to COVID-19 out of Sub-Saharan Africa where editors stood their ground for authoritative information on the pandemic, slighting the views of the citizenry.  Text Featured in this Episode:Gondwe, G., Ferrucci, P., & Tandoc Jr, E. C. (2022). Community Gatekeeping: Understanding Information Dissemination by Journalists in Sub-Saharan Africa. Journalism Practice, 1-17.Salaudeen, M. A. (2021). From Personal to Professional: Exploring the Influences on Journalists’ Evaluation of Citizen Journalism Credibility. Journalism Practice, 1-24.Saad, E., & da Silveira, S. C. (2021). New Online Journalism Businesses: Exploring Profiles, Models and Variables in the Current Brazilian Scenario. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.6: Digital News Ethics, Data, & Disrespect
13-04-2022
The J Word 4.6: Digital News Ethics, Data, & Disrespect
This is our each-season special featuring of thoughts from Journalism Practice’s Associate and Engagement editors that focuses on their own major and recent works to get us thinking about journalism in new ways across the globe. Associate Editor and Reader in the Department of Journalism at City, University of London, Zahera Harb, shares her work on combatting hate speech in newsrooms across the Middle East. Jaume Suau, at Ramon Lull University in Spain, also an Associate Editor, updates us on issues of disinformation that’s impacting journalism and his recent work on helping to shape a code of ethics for journalists across Europe. And, the journal’s new Engagement Editor, Eddy Borges-Rey, Associate Professor in Residence in the Journalism and Strategic Communication Program at Northwestern University in Qatar, brings to light an important discussion on journalism in the Global South. Text and Resources Featured in this Episode:Borges-Rey, E. (2016). Unravelling data journalism: A study of data journalism practice in British newsrooms. Journalism Practice, 10(7), 833-843.Suau, J., Masip, P., & Ruiz, C. (2019). Missing the big wave: Citizens’ discourses against the participatory formats adopted by news media. Journalism practice, 13(10), 1316-1332.Xu, N., & Gutsche Jr, R. E. (2021). Going Offline”: Social Media, Source Verification, and Chinese Investigative Journalism During “Information Overload. Journalism Practice, 15(8), 1146-1162. Gutsche, Jr., R. E. (Ed.). (2022). The Future of the Presidency, Journalism, and Democracy: After Trump. Routledge.Harb, Z. (2011). Channels of Resistance in Lebanon: Liberation Propaganda, Hezbollah and the Media. Bloomsbury. Matar, D., & Harb, Z. (2013). Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communications Practices in Lebanon and Palestine. Bloomsbury.Harb, Z. (2020, August 26). “How hate speech is harming journalism in Lebanon.” Ethicaljournalismnetwork.org. Ethical Journalism Network. (nd.) “Hate speech: A 5 point test for journalists.”Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.5: Covering Climate Change Contestations
30-03-2022
The J Word 4.5: Covering Climate Change Contestations
This episode is the second of two focused on how journalists balance reporting on climate change’s synergistic effects – the related and consequential results of a changing climate. Our conversation surrounds a double special issue of Journalism Practice co-edited with Juliet Pinto from the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at Pennsylvania State University in the U.S. Juliet is also co-editor of the book Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication, as well as News Media Coverage of Environmental Challenges in Latin America & The Caribbean: Mediating Demand, Degradation, and Development. Guests include Dimitrinka Atanasova (recorded separately), a Lecturer in the Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University in the U.K., who authored, “How constructive news outlets reported the synergistic effects of climate change and COVID-19 through metaphors.” Lawrence Brannon, a Lecturer in Media and Journalism at University Academy 92 in the U.K., shares his co-authored piece that examines the potentials of communicating against misinformation through interactivity and gamification in interactive documentaries. And, Mimi Perreault is an Assistant Professor at East Tennessee State University in the U.S. who talks through her findings of her co-authored article that examines metajournalistic discourse in the complexities of covering COVID-19 and the climate crisis. This special issue and podcast episode is a result of a 2020 Lancaster University Data Science Institute Workshop titled UK Underwater. You can learn more about that workshop at ukunderwater.com.  Text and Resources Featured in this Episode:Gutsche, Jr., R. E. & Pinto, J. (2022). Covering synergistic effects of climate change: Global challenges for journalism . Journalism Practice.Pinto, J., Gutsche, Jr., R. E., Prado, P. (Eds.). (2019). Climate change, media & culture: Critical issues in global environmental communication.Takahashi, B., Pinto, J., Vigón, M., & Chávez, M. (2018). News media coverage of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. Perreault, G., Perreault, M. F., & Maares, P. (2021). Metajournalistic Discourse as a Stabilizer within the Journalistic Field: Journalistic Practice in the Covid-19 Pandemic. Journalism Practice, 1-19.Atanasova, D. (2021). How constructive news outlets reported the synergistic effects of climate change and COVID-19 through metaphors. Journalism Practice, 1-20.Brannon, L., Gold, L., Magee, J., & Walton, G. (2021). The Potential of Interactivity and Gamification Within Immersive Journalism & Interactive Documentary (I-Docs) to Explore Climate Change Literacy and Inoculate Against Misinformation. Journalism Practice, 1-31.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.4: Covering Climate Change Synergies
16-03-2022
The J Word 4.4: Covering Climate Change Synergies
This episode extends conversations about climate change coverage to how journalists balance reporting on climate change’s synergistic effects – the related and consequential results of a changing climate. This is the first of two episodes produced with Juliet Pinto from the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at Pennsylvania State University in the U.S. about a double special issue of Journalism Practice with 16 articles from across the globe focusing on the question above – just how do you cover the synergistic effects of climate change? Juliet is also co-editor of the book Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication, as well as News Media Coverage of Environmental Challenges in Latin America & The Caribbean: Mediating Demand, Degradation, and Development. Guests include Waqas Ejaz at the National University of Sciences and Technology in Islamabad, Pakistan, about complications of mis- and dis-information around climate change there, Anne Hege Simonsen at the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Oslo Metropolitan University in Norway who talks about visual meanings and contradictions in news images of land-based wind turbines, and BBC News Lab’s David Caswell who discusses the potential of structured journalism in better covering climate news. This special issue and podcast episode is a result of a 2020 Lancaster University Data Science Institute Workshop titled UK Underwater. You can learn more about that workshop at ukunderwater.com. Text and Resources Featured in this Episode:Gutsche, Jr., R. E. & Pinto, J. (2022). Covering synergistic effects of climate change: Global challenges for journalism . Journalism Practice.Pinto, J., Gutsche, Jr., R. E., Prado, P. (Eds.). (2019). Climate change, media & culture: Critical issues in global environmental communication. Takahashi, B., Pinto, J., Vigón, M., & Chávez, M. (2018). News media coverage of environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. Caswell, D. (2021). Telling Every Story: Characteristics of Systematic Reporting. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Simonsen, A. H. (2022). Blowing in the Wind—Norwegian Wind Power Photographs in Transition. Journalism Practice, 1-19.Ejaz, W., Ittefaq, M., & Arif, M. (2021). Understanding Influences, Misinformation, and Fact-Checking Concerning Climate-Change Journalism in Pakistan. Journalism Practice, 1-21.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.3: Debates of "Alternative" News
02-03-2022
The J Word 4.3: Debates of "Alternative" News
This episode unpacks current debates on the meanings, roles, and futures of alternative news. Guests include David Dowling, Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Iowa in the U.S., who talks about activist journalism through the case of the Unicorn Riot website coverage of social justice protests in the U.S. Jannie Møller Hartley is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and Arts at Roskilde University in Denmark and talks about tensions between “objective” and activist – or alternative – coverage of #MeToo in Denmark and Sweden. And, Marcus Funk, Associate Professor of Mass Communication at Sam Houston State University in the U.S., identifies forms of alternative journalism – in this case about climate change – that could be adopted by mainstream media to connect better with audiences.Text Featured in this Episode:Møller Hartley, J., & Askanius, T. (2021). Activist-journalism and the Norm of Objectivity: Role Performance in the Reporting of the# MeToo Movement in Denmark and Sweden. Journalism Practice, 15(6), 860-877.Funk, M. (2021). Calm During the Storm: Micro-Assemblage, Meteorology and Community Building on a Local Independent Weather Blog During Hurricane Harvey. Journalism Practice, 1-17.Dowling, D. O. (2021). Alternative Media on the Front Lines: Unicorn Riot and Activist Journalism’s New Urgency. Journalism Practice, 1-20.  Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 4.2: How Free are Journalists?
16-02-2022
The J Word 4.2: How Free are Journalists?
In this episode, we discuss not just how free journalists are across the globe, but how we can better understand the complications of journalistic autonomy. In other words, we ask, “What types of freedoms are there for journalists?” Guests include Cláudia Álvares, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at ISCTE: Lisbon University Institute in Portugal, who discusses “journalistic freedom” from political partisanship, while Signe Ivask, a Postdoctoral Researcher at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic, examines the role of journalistic autonomy and “freedom” in making tough editorial decisions, specifically in publishing visuals of violence and death. Basyouni Hamada, Professor in the Department of Mass Communication at Qatar University, in Qatar, also discusses of one of the most recognized aspects of journalistic freedom and autonomy – physical safety.Text Featured in this Episode:Alvares, C., Cardoso, G., Crespo, M., & Pinto-Martinho, A. (2021). Seeking the Legitimation of Mainstream Journalism: A Portuguese Case-Study. Journalism Practice, 1-16.Ivask, S., Laak, B., & Kuulpak, K. (2021). “All by Myself?” Journalists’ Routines and Decision-making in Gathering and Publishing Death-related Visuals. Journalism Practice, 1-17.Hamada, B. I. (2021). Determinants of Journalists’ Autonomy and Safety: Evidence from the Worlds of Journalism Study. Journalism Practice, 1-21.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.10: Digital News Numbers
28-12-2021
The J Word 3.10: Digital News Numbers
This episode focuses more on the meanings of numbers in today’s digital journalism than in doing math. We explore issues of power, culture, professionalism, and inequalities – all surrounding how journalists use numbers.In this airing, we speak with B.T. Lawson, a University Teacher in Media and Communication at Loughborough University in the UK and author of “Hiding behind databases, institutions and actors,” which interrogates how journalists rely sometimes more on sources than their own verification in the numbers they share in their reporting.Jairo Lugo-Ocando, who is Director of Executive and Graduate Education at Northwestern University in Qatar discusses his coauthored piece, “Using statistics in business and financial news in the Arabian Gulf” that examines the intersections of professionalism and numbers literacy. And, Elizabeth Meyers Hendrickson, an Associate Professor in the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University in the U.S. and co-author of “Mergers, acquisitions and magazine media in 2021,”  looks at how journalists interpret news about when they, themselves, are numbers in reporting on media mergers and layoffs.Text Featured in this Episode:Lawson, B. T. (2021). Hiding Behind Databases, Institutions and Actors: How Journalists Use Statistics in Reporting Humanitarian Crises. Journalism Practice, 1-21.Hendrickson, E. M., & Subotin, A. (2021). Mergers, Acquisitions and Magazine Media in 2021. Journalism Practice, 1-15. Alaqil, F., & Lugo-Ocando, J. (2021). Using Statistics in Business and Financial News in the Arabian Gulf: Between Normative Journalistic Professional Aspirations and ‘Real’ Practice. Journalism Practice, 1-24. Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.9: The Potentials of Peace Journalism
14-12-2021
The J Word 3.9: The Potentials of Peace Journalism
Does the notion of peace journalism always mean there must be a war going on Just what is peace journalism? How does it differ from solutions, constructive, and, well, just “good” journalism? We debate and discuss approaches to peace journalism in this episode looking at journalism from physical violence in Ethiopia and Kenya, and in the war-language used in battles against COVID-19 across Europe.Richard Thomas joins us as an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Media and Communications at Swansea University in the U.K., who is coauthor of “Peace journalism in theory and practice” who will give us an overview of peace journalism today. Téwodros Workneh is Assistant Professor of Global Communication at Kent State University in the U.S. and is author of “From state repression to fear of non-state actors,” who talks about peace journalism’s use in understanding the weaponization of media messages. And Tamar Haruna Dambo is in the Faculty of Communication and Media Studies at Eastern Mediterranean University in North Cyprus and co-author of “Covering the Covid-19 pandemic using peace journalism approach.” Text Featured in this Episode:Ersoy, M., & Dambo, T. H. (2021). Covering the Covid-19 Pandemic Using Peace Journalism Approach. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Workneh, T. W. (2021). From State Repression to Fear of non-state Actors: Examining Emerging Threats of Journalism Practice in Ethiopia. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Arregui, C., Thomas, R., & Kilby, A. (2020). Peace Journalism in Theory and Practice: Kenyan and Foreign Correspondent Perspectives. Journalism Practice, 1-20. Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.8: Measuring Digital News Meanings
03-12-2021
The J Word 3.8: Measuring Digital News Meanings
It’s finally here – our episode on methods! Bonnie Brennen, Editor-in-Chief of Journalism Practice and Professor Emerita at in the Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University in the U.S., discusses her newly updated book Qualitative Research Methods for Media Studies and comments on the complexities and promise of methodological advancements in journalism studies.Lisa Merete Kristensen, a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Centre for Journalism and the Department of Political Science and Public Management at the University of Southern Denmark, talks method through her article, “Audience metrics." And, Ayleen Cabas-Mijares,  Assistant Professor in the Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University, joins in with her piece “Covering (il)Legible Bodies” where she applies qualitative interpretive approaches to understand news coverage of the Undocuqueer movement, an understudied community of queer undocumented migrants in the U.S.Text Featured in this Episode:Brennen, B. S. (2021). Qualitative Research Methods for Media Studies. Third Edition.Kristensen, L. M. (2021). Audience Metrics: Operationalizing News Value for the Digital Newsroom. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Cabas-Mijares, A. (2021). Covering (il)Legible Bodies: A CDA of News Discourse about Undocuqueer Life in the US. Journalism Practice, 1-18.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.7: The Future of (Human) Journalism
23-11-2021
The J Word 3.7: The Future of (Human) Journalism
Artificial intelligence, “robot journalism,” augmented and virtual realities. Journalism is always looking for the “next thing” in innovation to build audiences, trust, and sustainable futures. A lot of the innovation comes in the form of technology, but there are also adaptations that only humans can make. So, what’s the future for humans in journalism?Samuel Danzon-Chambaud is a researcher with Dublin City University’s Institute for Future Media and Journalism in Ireland and is co-author of “Changing or reinforcing the ‘rules of the game.’ He’s here to talk about a model he’s developing to understand journalists’ take on new technologies. Oscar Westlund is a Professor in the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Oslo Metropolitan University and is co-author of “Critical moments of coordination in newswork,” where he takes a look at the behind-the-scenes of newswork for Online Live Broadcasts to show the organizational needs and approaches of journalists working with new media.And, Isabel MacDonald is an independent journalist and researcher who is author of “Picturing Haitian earthquake survivors,” where she explores the technologies of paper and pencil in her graphic depictions of human suffering and resilience.   Text Featured in this Episode:Macdonald, I. (2021). Picturing Haitian Earthquake Survivors: Graphic Reportage as an Ethical Strategy for Representing Vulnerable Sources. Journalism Practice, 1-21.Westlund, O., & Ekström, M. (2021). Critical Moments of Coordination in Newswork. Journalism Practice, 1-19.Danzon-Chambaud, S., & Cornia, A. (2021). Changing or Reinforcing the “Rules of the Game”: A Field Theory Perspective on the Impacts of Automated Journalism on Media Practitioners. Journalism Practice, 1-15.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.6: Sourcing the Vulnerable
09-11-2021
The J Word 3.6: Sourcing the Vulnerable
Journalism sometimes gets a bad rap for its role in marginalizing voices – especially because journalism is supposed to be about tackling power structures. Guests in this episode provide their takes on sourcing the vulnerable and try to flip the script by providing some ways journalism can protect the marginalized and ignored.Mi Rosie Jahng, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University in the U.S. and the co-author of “Reconstructing the Informal and Invisible,” helps us see how journalists are responding to the most-recent attack on their authority through cries against “fake news,” cries that are increasing public concerns that journalism doesn’t stand for truth. From Spain, Mathias-Felipe de-Lima-Santos, a researcher at the University of Navarra and co-author of “Data journalism in favela,” takes a focused look at specific efforts journalists are taking to humanize data about forgotten and marginalized folk. And Milda Malling, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Journalism Department at Södertörn University in Sweden and author of “Reconstructing the informal and invisible,” reminds us that the way journalism marginalizes may be at the roots of how it works with sources, alerting us to the engrained nature of power in the press. Text Featured in this Episode:de-Lima-Santos, M. F., & Mesquita, L. (2021). Data Journalism in favela: Made by, for, and about Forgotten and Marginalized Communities. Journalism Practice, 1-19.Malling, M. (2021). Reconstructing the Informal and Invisible: Interactions Between Journalists and Political Sources in Two Countries. Journalism Practice, 1-21.Jahng, M. R., Eckert, S., & Metzger-Riftkin, J. (2021). Defending the Profession: US Journalists’ Role Understanding in the Era of Fake News. Journalism Practice, 1-19.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com
The J Word 3.5: Speculating Social Media Futures
26-10-2021
The J Word 3.5: Speculating Social Media Futures
Journalists use social media to predict – and to respond – to audiences’ interests and needs. But how is this kind of engagement reshaping news and its processes for the future? Can we use our predictive methods of social media use, such as metrics, to also speculate about how journalists can use social media of the future? In this episode, Constanza Gajardo León, a Ph.D. candidate at Vrije Universiteit in The Netherlands and coauthor of “From abstract news users to living citizens,” talks with us about the best methods being used to understand – and guess – what audiences want and where they will go next for their news. And Zhao Peng, a lecturer at Boston’s Emerson College in the U.S. discusses her coauthored piece, “An examination of how social and technological perceptions predict social media news use on WeChat,” moves us into a futuristic take on what social media could be based on the innovations of today’s platforms.Text Featured in this Episode:Peng, Z., & Miller, S. (2021). An Examination of How Social and Technological Perceptions Predict Social Media News Use on WeChat. Journalism Practice, 1-20.Gajardo, C., Costera Meijer, I., & Domingo, D. (2021). From Abstract News Users to Living Citizens: Assessing Audience Engagement Through a Professional Lens. Journalism Practice, 1-17.Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com