Diverse Thinking Different Learning

Karen Wilson

Diverse Thinking · Different Learning, a ChildNEXUS podcast, is hosted by pediatric neuropsychologist, mom of two, and ChildNEXUS founder Dr. Karen Wilson. Each week, Dr. Wilson provides support and guidance for parents raising kids with learning differences. Diverse Thinking · Different Learning features informative and inspiring interviews with top experts in their fields, and gives parents and educators the tools and takeaways they need to better understand neurodivergence, learning disabilities, and youth mental health. This podcast informs offers actionable advice to help diverse learners and children with unique needs reach their fullest potential. Parents of diverse learners or children with mental health challenges can access vetted information and connect with qualified professionals at https://www.childnexus.com/. read less
Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

Ep. 173: Why Treating Symptoms Isn’t Enough for Child Wellbeing with Hokehe Eko, MD MPH FAAP
Yesterday
Ep. 173: Why Treating Symptoms Isn’t Enough for Child Wellbeing with Hokehe Eko, MD MPH FAAP
Did you know that most children with ADHD are given medication, offered some counseling, and nothing else? Today's episode is a game-changer, especially for parents navigating the challenges of ADHD because today’s guest wants to change this. Dr. Hokehe Eko joins us to discuss her unique approach, one that focuses on empowering children with ADHD without solely relying on medication. Dr. Eko believes it's time to shift our focus from merely treating symptoms to understanding the whole child. In our conversation, Dr. Eko shares her insights into how trauma and lifestyle factors impact a child's behavior and cognitive development. Instead of rushing to medication, Dr. Eko advocates for lifestyle and environmental changes that support a child's overall well-being. From nutrition to hydration, she discusses practical steps parents can take to empower their children and create a supportive environment for their growth. You may be surprised by the impact of small lifestyle changes and how they can positively influence a child's behavior and family dynamics. While there’s no “quick fix,” these small incremental changes not only benefit ADHD symptoms but the well-being of the whole family.   Show Notes: [2:21] - Dr. Eko is a pediatrician and a big advocate for empowering our brains. She has a different approach to looking at the whole child. [3:55] - During some training, Dr. Eko had the realization of how things could change. She shares the story of what inspired her approach. [5:55] - Trauma makes changes in the way our brains work and our behavior. [8:30] - You can never just assess symptoms.  [10:50] - Before jumping to medication, Dr. Eko looks at simple lifestyle and environmental changes. [13:03] - If we feed the brain what it needs and what it craves, we are healthier overall. [14:34] - Behaviors are difficult and there isn’t necessarily a “quick fix.” However, lifestyle changes could benefit the overall health of the child more than medication. [17:18] - Dr. Eko discusses the impact of nutrition on behavior. [20:29] - If your child is healthier, the whole family is better overall. [22:10] - Change one thing at a time. All the small changes build up. [23:26] - Dr. Eko shares some suggestions on how to increase the amount of water you and your family drink that also gets the child on board. [26:24] - It is a process. Take it one day at a time and do things as a family. [28:36] - Dr. Eko emphasizes the importance of executive functioning skills and what parents can do to support their children. [31:00] - Have a conversation with your child and explain what is going on. They need to understand as they form their identity. [32:36] - Dr. Eko offers a support group and community and the information can be found on her website. She also shares the details of her recent book.   About Our Guest: Dr. Hokehe Eko is a Mom, Board Certified Pediatrician, TedX Speaker, and CEO of Glow Pediatrics PLLC. She partners with parents of children with ADHD/Autism to address the root causes of their children's behaviors so they GLOW with health from the inside out. She is also CEO of Kits of Hope, a 501 (3) organization, sharing love, hope, and dignity with children in foster care.   Connect with Dr. Hokehe Eko: Brain Power with Dr. Eko Podcast LinkedIn Children’s Love Letters: A Pediatrician’s Guide to How Your Child Spells Love by Hokehe Eko MD, MPH   Links and Related Resources: Episode 149: Supporting Children and Teens’ Mental Health Via Nutrition Episode 169: The Science of Exercise and the Brain with Dr. John Ratey Episode 148: How Sleep Affects Academic Performance and Mood 8 Ways Teenagers Suffer When They Don’t Get Enough Sleep   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 172: How to Talk to Kids About Mistakes and Failure with Dr. Robyn Silverman
13-02-2024
Ep. 172: How to Talk to Kids About Mistakes and Failure with Dr. Robyn Silverman
In this episode, we explore how children and teens who learn and think differently perceive mistakes and failure. Dr. Robyn Silverman, AKA the “Conversation Doc,” renowned child and teen development specialist and best-selling author, guides us through the complexities of navigating tough conversations about failure with young people. Drawing from her book, How to Talk to Kids About Anything, Dr. Robyn underscores the importance of reframing failure as an opportunity for growth and learning. In a society driven by achievement, children with learning differences often struggle with fears of failure and making mistakes. Dr. Robyn emphasizes the need for parents and educators to foster an environment where children feel safe to take risks and embrace imperfection. From reframing academic setbacks to celebrating incremental progress, she offers practical strategies for instilling a growth mindset in children and teens. Throughout the episode, Dr. Robyn encourages parents to reflect on their own reactions to failure and perfection. Mistakes are an inevitable part of the learning process and that goes for parents, too. By de-emphasizing outcomes and focusing on the journey of growth, parents can empower their children to develop resilience and self-confidence.    Show Notes: [2:50] - In her book, Dr. Robyn walks families through having tough conversations with kids and teens. [4:18] - Kids with learning differences often have worries about messing up. We need to have conversations about failure and mistakes. [5:30] - The only way we grow and learn is if we take risks and try even if we fail. [6:51] - We are in an achievement-focused culture and it makes it hard for kids to understand that mistakes are actually opportunities. [9:27] - When it comes to academics, seeing failure doesn’t feel like an opportunity. [10:49] - It is crucial for kids to come to an understanding that their performance does not reflect who they are. [13:47] - A great example of mistakes as opportunities is learning how to play a musical instrument. [15:45] - Kids of certain ages rely on very concrete thinking. Take photos of accomplishments and even the mistakes for them to see how they have improved. [17:10] - The only person we can compare yourself to is yourself and this is challenging for kids and teens. [19:22] - Parents need to reflect on how they react to “perfect” and “imperfect” performance and behavior. [21:46] - Parents are also going to make a ton of mistakes and that’s okay. [23:27] - See the value, even if the achievement hasn’t been made. [24:45] - We don’t want to convey the feeling that negative consequences are the result of failure. This leads to kids not trying. [27:46] - Show kids stories of amazing and successful people who have experienced failure before their fame. [29:13] - Deemphasize the outcome and focus on the process. [31:24] - What is your definition of bringing out the best in your child? It might need to be reframed.   About Our Guest: Known as the "Conversation Doc," Dr. Robyn Silverman is a child and teen development specialist and author of the bestselling book, How to Talk to Kids About Anything, as well as the host of the popular podcast of the same name. She is a cofounder of the Powerful Words Character System, which gives educators the talking points they need to help children become kind, responsible citizens of the world.  Dr. Robyn has appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS Early Show and Nightline and has been quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, CNN.com, and many other publications. She lives with her husband, two kids and a fuzzy rescue dog who loves sunning himself on their front steps, even in the summer heat of North Carolina. Find out all about the book at DrRobynSilverman.com.   Connect with Dr. Robyn Silverman: DrRobynSilverman.com Dr. Silverman on Instagram   Links and Related Resources: How to Talk to Kids About Anything by Dr. Robyn Silverman How to Talk to Kids About Anything Podcast How to Talk to Kids About Learning Disabilities with Dr. Karen Wilson   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 171: Is it Shyness or Social Anxiety? with Dr. Fran Walfish
06-02-2024
Ep. 171: Is it Shyness or Social Anxiety? with Dr. Fran Walfish
Would you describe your child as passive, quiet around others, uncomfortable in social situations, a child that avoids eye contact, and maybe hesitates to try new things? Does your child excessively rehearse what they want to say or how they want to behave? Some parents may wonder if this is shyness or something more. Is it social anxiety? Today, we’re digging into the topic of both. Is it shyness or social anxiety and how do you know? And what can we do to help? Dr. Fran Walfish is an absolute expert in this field and in our conversation today, she not only offers some clarification on the differences between shyness and social anxiety, but also shares things we can do to support these children better and when to seek professional help and guidance. She is a wealth of knowledge and I am thrilled for you to hear our conversation.   Show Notes: [3:21] - First, shyness is an innate trait. It’s something human beings are born with. A child comes into the world already predisposed with a particular temperament. [4:42] - Shyness can sometimes look like anxiety. There are so many ingredients that shape a person’s personality and behavior. [6:36] - The child should be the one to dictate the comfort level, rather than it being driven by the parent's fear of embarrassment or shame due to the child's shyness. [8:31] - Certain things can lead to social anxiety.  [10:20] - Not all shy people have social anxiety. [12:11] - Well-meaning parents may feel embarrassed or exceedingly worried about a child’s shyness. [14:37] - Selective mutism is a confusing presentation of social anxiety. [16:58] - It is crucial for parents not to pressure kids. It could lead to them withholding even more. [19:12] - The parent who is trying to discern the difference between social anxiety and shyness needs to be non-judgmental. [21:35] - Create some reasonable separation and assure your child that you are there. [23:01] - Just like adults, children want to be seen, acknowledged, validated and accepted - flaws and all. [24:40] - What can parents and teachers do to help children with social anxiety? Dr. Walfish shares some tips. [26:25] - Expect some successes and failures. [31:21] - If parents see their child crying and sobbing in most social situations, it is time to search for a referral.   About Our Guest: Dr. Fran Walfish is a leading child, couples, family, relationship, and sex psychotherapist and author in Beverly Hills, CA who treats celebrity couples, Hollywood’s elite, and LA’s poshest residents. In addition to her thriving private practice, Dr. Walfish was on clinical staff in the Department of Child Psychiatry at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for 15 years. She was a Beverly Hills school psychologist and served a 4 year-term as Chair of the Board of The Early Childhood Parenting Center founded at Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles. Dr. Fran was the host and co-star on WE tv series, Sex Box. Dr. Walfish also appeared as an on-camera expert psychotherapist in 15 episodes on The Robert Irvine Show, CW/Tribune Networks. Dr. Walfish is a featured expert in Parents magazine “Ask The Experts'', and formerly in her weekly Q & A in The Beverly Hills Courier. She is an expert contributor to several news outlets and publications.   Dr. Fran’s book, The Self-Aware Parent: Resolving Conflict and Building A Better Bond with Your Child, is represented by William Morris Endeavor Entertainment and published by Palgrave Macmillan/St. Martin’s Press. Simon & Schuster published her original chapter Why Empathy Matters in their all-star psychologists anthology book Tough Love in 2018.  Dr. Walfish has been quoted in NY Bestselling books authored by Arianna Huffington, Randi Zuckerberg, and Josh Shipp.   Connect with Dr. Fran Walfish: DrFranWalfish.com   Links and Related Resources: How Social Anxiety Differs From Shyness and How to Help Your Child Episode 170: Understanding Selective Mutism with Dr. Danielle Cornacchio   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 170: Understanding Selective Mutism with Dr. Danielle Cornacchio
30-01-2024
Ep. 170: Understanding Selective Mutism with Dr. Danielle Cornacchio
If your child is afraid to speak around certain people, like adults or strangers, or in certain situations, like at school, they may be struggling with selective mutism. Selective mutism is an anxiety disorder characterized by an inability to speak in certain settings and to certain people. It is commonly misunderstood as shyness or a child could even be misdiagnosed as having Autism Spectrum Disorder or Oppositional Defiance Disorder. But what exactly is selective mutism and how can we tell the difference?  Today’s guest helps demystify selective mutism and offers a lot of insight into ways we can help children thrive. Dr. Danielle Cornacchio is the newest member of ChildNEXUS! She is a clinical child psychologist specializing in evidence-based treatments for childhood anxiety, OCD, and disruptive behavior disorders. Dr. Cornacchio has particular expertise in behavioral treatment for childhood selective mutism. In this episode, Dr. Cornacchio explains what selective mutism is, but perhaps more importantly, she explains what it is not. She takes the time to describe what treatment for selective mutism might look like and emphasizes the importance of parent education and participation. Listen to learn more about this often misunderstood condition.   Show Notes: [2:27] - Selective mutism is classified as an anxiety disorder. It is a consistent failure to speak in certain situations despite speaking fine in others. [4:03] - Selective mutism is not Autism Spectrum Disorder or Oppositional Defiance Disorder. It is often misunderstood or misdiagnosed. [7:13] - Kids with selective mutism will typically speak around their parents and siblings at home but won’t speak at school. [11:24] - Information and research on treatment for selective mutism is very new but Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is the most beneficial. [14:04] - Dr. Cornacchio shares some of the ways selective mutism shows up including learning situations where talking is not necessary and something called contamination. [17:58] - Therapy sessions once a week are not enough if parents and family members are not also working with a child at home. [21:14] - It’s human nature to want to protect your children and reduce their stress, but to overcome challenges, children need to step out of their comfort zones. [24:13] - Dr. Cornacchio demonstrates the steps in early therapy sessions with children with selective mutism including behavior descriptions and labeled praise. [26:34] - The type of question that we ask a child who is ready to speak really matters. [28:11] - Giving children ample time to answer a question can be uncomfortable for parents. [29:29] - After 5 seconds of wait time, if the child does not answer, Dr. Cornacchio demonstrates how to rephrase the question and try something different. [31:47] - But what happens if the child still does not answer a question after different strategies? [33:29] - Teachers do not have the luxury of trying questions multiple times and waiting for answers. But there is a Plan B for teachers to not ever give up on a question. [37:37] - It is important to connect with a provider, but it is challenging to find one that treats selective mutism.   About Our Guest: Dr. Cornacchio completed her PhD in Clinical Science in Child and Adolescent Psychology at Florida International University and her predoctoral internship training at the UCLA Semel Institute. She currently serves as a clinical instructor at the UCLA Psychology Department. Dr. Cornacchio founded and currently directs The WaveMind Clinic in Los Angeles, a clinic dedicated to providing specialized care to children and families with a variety of mental health needs, including selective mutism, OCD, and disruptive behavior disorders. She directs a training program for psychology students and postdoctoral trainees learning Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and treatment for childhood selective mutism. Dr. Cornacchio leads training for educators and professionals interested in learning more about how to treat selective mutism. Dr. Cornacchio’s research interests focus on innovative treatment formats for difficult-to-treat child anxiety. She conducted the first randomized controlled trial of an intensive group treatment program for children with selective mutism and is currently co-authoring a manual that’s in press on the delivery of intensive treatment for children with selective mutism.    Connect with Dr. Danielle Cornacchio: WaveMind Clinic Website ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Email: dcornacchio@wavemindclinic.com    Links and Related Resources: Selective Mutism Association website with many resources and a provider database Dr. Steve Kurtz’s Selective Mutism Learning University self-guided course   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 169: The Science of Exercise and the Brain with Dr. John Ratey
23-01-2024
Ep. 169: The Science of Exercise and the Brain with Dr. John Ratey
We know that exercise does have a positive impact on the brain. We know that exercise can optimize brain function and prevent cognitive decline in adults. But what can it do for children and adolescents that learn and think differently? Today’s guest is Dr. John Ratey, an internationally recognized expert in neuropsychiatry. Dr. Ratey became interested in the science of exercise and the brain early on in his career and has seen first-hand the benefits not only to one’s body, but also behavior, executive functioning skills, and even attention. In today’s episode, Dr. Ratey digs in and explains how exercise and being physically active can change more than your physical health.   Show Notes: [2:38] - Dr. Ratey became interested in the impact of exercise on the brain as an athlete in medical school and seeing studies comparing exercise and antidepressants. [4:49] - Dr. Ratey also became interested in ADHD, specifically how it impacts adults. [6:31] - Consistent exercise can be a type of treatment for ADHD symptoms. [7:45] - Not only do our bodies need exercise, but our brains do as well. [8:52] - The beauty of exercise is the accessibility. [11:12] - When we move, we activate the same nerve cells that we use to think. [13:12] - Movement and exercise improve attention as well as executive functioning skills. [15:04] - Dr. Ratey explains how he has visited schools over the years and has seen the results of exercise on student behavior. [17:29] - Dr. Ratey lists the endorphins and hormones that are increased as a result of exercise. [20:42] - The more brain cells you activate, the more BDNF you have. It is like brain fertilizer. [23:06] - Dr. Ratey calls this “Miracle-Gro for your brain.” [25:23] - Exercise also has an impact on the cerebellum which is discussed at length in the book, ADHD 2.0. [29:29] - “Sitting is the new smoking.” The more sedentary someone is, the less healthy they are. [30:44] - The experience of COVID-19 changed our society’s drive to exercise and move their bodies. [31:39] - To optimize brain function and prevent cognitive decline, exercise is so important.   About Our Guest: John J. Ratey, MD, is an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and an internationally recognized expert in Neuropsychiatry. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles, and 12 books published in 20 languages, including the groundbreaking ADD-ADHD “Driven to Distraction” series with Ned Hallowell, MD. Their latest release, ADHD 2.0 (2021) explores new science and strategies. With the publication of his bestseller, "Spark-The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain," Dr. Ratey established himself as one of the world's foremost authorities on the brain-fitness connection in areas such as ADHD, Autism, Aging, and Cognition. Recognized by his peers as one of the Best Doctors in America since 1997, Dr. Ratey was recently honored by the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society as "Outstanding Psychiatrist of the Year" for advancing the field. Dr. Ratey and his work are frequently profiled in the media, where he’s been featured on ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS and NPR, as well as in The New York Times, Newsweek, The Washington Post, US News and World Report, Men’s Health, and other national publications. Dr. Ratey maintains an active practice in Cambridge, MA and Los Angeles, CA.   Connect with Dr. Ratey: JohnRatey.com   Links and Related Resources: Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by. Dr. John Ratey ADHD 2.0: New Science and Essential Strategies for Thriving with Distraction - from Childhood Through Adulthood by Dr. John Ratey and Dr. Edward Hallowell Episode 40: Lifestyle Activities That Can Improve ADHD Symptoms with Dr. Joel Nigg   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 168: 5 Tips for Supporting Neurodivergent Youth
16-01-2024
Ep. 168: 5 Tips for Supporting Neurodivergent Youth
Welcome to the new year of Diverse Thinking Different Learning! We’re setting the stage for a great year of celebrating neurodiversity and recognizing it as a spectrum that encompasses a range of differences. Our goal is to highlight the strengths and unique qualities of neurodivergent individuals while also challenging stigmas and stereotypes. In this quick episode, you’ll learn five quick tips for supporting neurodivergent youth. We will focus on these topics and more throughout the year. Be sure to check out the recommended episodes below and join our email list so you don’t miss out!   Show Notes: [1:22] - Neurodiversity is the natural variation in the human brain which encompasses a wide range. [3:30] - Tip #1: Cultivate a strength-based approach. [4:10] - Tip #2: Promote inclusive education practices. [4:44] - Tip #3: Foster social inclusion. [5:53] - Tip #4: Provide resources and training. [6:13] - Tip #5: Challenge stereotypes and stigmas.   Links and Related Resources: Episode 144: Raising Differently Wired Kids with Joy and Confidence with Debbie Reber Episode 120: Meeting the Needs of Culturally and Neurodiverse Students with Juniette Kanga and Maria Kennedy Episode 28: Why We Need to Celebrate and Continue to Build Our Kids’ Resilience   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 167: From Surviving to Thriving: A Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs and Well-Being with Leslie Forde
09-01-2024
Ep. 167: From Surviving to Thriving: A Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs and Well-Being with Leslie Forde
Many parents, particularly moms, feel like taking care of your health and well-being only comes after your family’s needs are met. That essentially means that there’s no time left for any form of self-care. But today’s guest discusses how we can take better care of ourselves and in doing so, take better care of the ones we love. Leslie Forde is the CEO and Founder of Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs®. Her business provides evidence-based tools for moms to reclaim time from the never-done list for well-being. And she helps employers retain caregivers. Over 3,500 parents have participated since March of 2020 in the Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs research study - the longest running study of its kind about the pandemic’s ongoing impact on the work/life, care, and wellness needs of parents.   Show Notes: [2:45] - Leslie returned to work after a second maternity leave and didn’t learn the importance of a mom’s hierarchy of needs until she completely burned out. [4:19] - When she went back to work, she felt like the answer was to just work “harder.” [5:26] - In hindsight, there were a lot of signs that she was not okay. Everyone was flourishing except for her. [7:46] - Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs has self-care at the top. But the reason we don’t spend time on this is because the other things are never done. [10:28] - If you think that you will start something for yourself when something else is done, you will never start. [11:58] - Health problems for moms often don’t show up until later in life and can be attributed to ignoring self-care practices. [14:10] - Leslie shares a story about making cookies and how a hobby can turn into something stressful. [15:51] - Your health and well-being is of equal importance to your children’s health and well-being. [16:55] - Consequences of ignoring health are gradual and it could feel easier to put it off compared to more immediate consequences of focusing on your family. [18:38] - Perfection is not critical. Be flexible and find a set of practices that work for you. [19:59] - Mom-guilt is real and it is a heavy weight. [21:57] - Navigating the health and unique needs of a neurodiverse child is huge and a significant amount of work. [23:08] - Awareness and education is improving and is better than it's ever been. But the systems in place are still not designed to help those who learn and think differently. [25:12] - Give yourself achievable goals that will make you feel the success of accomplishing work that needs to be done, but in more manageable ways. [26:12] - Guilt can be paralyzing, depressing, and decelerating. [27:36] - Self-care doesn’t mean a spa day. It could mean a good night’s sleep or a healthy meal. [29:03] - Find the resources that will help you. Your commitment is not to solve the problem. You don’t have to do it alone. [30:32] - Pick something from the top of Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs and make it a habit. [33:37] - If you can create a routine out of something, it will relieve a lot of the mental load of maintaining it. [36:46] - Defer, eliminate, outsource, or spouse source things that are too much to manage at once.   About Our Guest: Leslie has used research to inform growth and innovation strategy for over 20 years. Most recently, she held leadership positions at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Care.com and CSpace, an Omnicom market research agency. And for the past decade, she’s focused on media and technology for the childcare, eldercare, mental health, and education sectors. She’s a frequent speaker and consultant to organizations on how to retain and support parents, caregivers, and people of color, including HubSpot, Merck, Scholastic and the Barr Foundation. Her writing about well-being, equity and the future of work has appeared in The Washington Post, Slate, Parents Magazine, TLNT, Directorship and her website, Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs among other publications. She’s been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, CNN, National Geographic, Fast Company, US News & World Report, SHRM, and many other outlets.   Connect with Leslie: Email: Leslie@momshierarchyofneeds.com Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs Website Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs on Instagram   Links and Related Resources: TimeCheck App Mom’s Hierarchy of Needs Website   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 166: Educational Therapy, Distance Learning, and Social Justice with Dr. Bibi Pirayesh
02-01-2024
Ep. 166: Educational Therapy, Distance Learning, and Social Justice with Dr. Bibi Pirayesh
Let’s revisit one of our favorite Diverse Thinking Different Learning Podcast episodes with Dr. Bibi Pirayesh. Dr. Bibi Pirayesh is a Learning Specialist and an Educational Therapist who has been in private practice for over a decade. While the emphasis of Dr. Pirayesh’s work is on remediating learning disabilities in a one-on-one setting, she is also a sought after speaker and community advocate for children and families around learning rights. In this episode, we discuss how educational therapists help students develop the skills they need in order to be successful. You will also learn what can be done now to make a difference in the life of a child who is struggling in school. Listen on to hear Dr. Pirayesh’s riveting statements on how learning differences and disorders can be viewed as a social justice issue.   Show Notes: [2:31] - Dr. Pirayesh began her career in education by accident and shares her story on how she started on this path with observing children and families as a researcher. [7:14] - Using a processing lens, Dr. Pirayesh helps students with remediation by first knowing what the issues are and provides targeted intervention. [9:34] - Educational therapists are important as they will be able to bring in speech pathologists, occupational therapists, psychologists, etc. as they discover the needs of the student. [11:50] - There are certain types of progress that are really easy to measure. Bibi uses phonics and phonemic awareness as an example.  [12:32] - So much of the work is about helping kids own their learning and demystifying the learning process. There are a lot of emotions for parents and students to manage. [14:27] - All brains are equipped to learn, grow, and expand. When we are able to help a child find what is getting in the way of that natural flow. [15:30] - We live in a world where there is a lot of pressure on both students and parents. [16:49] - When kids struggle, they lose the motivation for learning. [18:41] - Bibi explains that the way our formal education system works is a very linear and limited way of thinking and it is a social injustice. [20:20] - What we know from research is that 10-15% of children struggle with learning difficulties. [21:24] - There is a constant demand for higher and better production and that is what our education system has become.  [23:24] - These issues are large-scale cultural issues, and so much of the work we need to do is to undo the damage. [27:27] - Many parents have trouble accessing the very resources that protect them. [28:57] - Due to the way these laws are designed, we see the overrepresentation of minorities and students from a low socio-economic background. [33:16] - When kids with learning difficulties pass through school, are they ready to navigate the real world? [36:23] - Communities are organically designed to be able to figure out and solve their own problems, but a narrow education system prevents this. [39:53] - The system needs to work in a way that increases access to services in an equitable way no matter where you attend school. [43:19] - We’ve limited ourselves by seeing the world through a very tiny lens. [44:30] - Having this conversation and acknowledging the problem is an important first step. [46:20] - “Regardless of what is going on, if you move forward with the idea of connecting, empathizing, and understanding, somehow miraculously it will work.” [48:45] - Take a moment to build a relationship with your child’s teacher and start a meaningful conversation. [49:47] - When you reach out to the teacher, you are modeling to your child that it is the right thing to do to make yourself vulnerable and ask for help. [51:10] - Remember that we are raising human beings and you can’t do that in a factory system.   About Our Guest: Dr. Bibi Pirayesh holds a Bachelor's degree in Neuroscience and Education from the University of Pittsburgh and a Master's degree in Developmental Psychology from Columbia University where her work focused primarily on children’s development of mathematical thinking and cognitive neuroscience.  While the emphasis of Dr. Pirayesh’s work is on remediating learning disabilities in a one-on-one setting, she is also a sought after speaker and community advocate for children and families around learning rights. Bibi works with children grades 1-12 and covers a wide range of learning difficulties including dyslexia, ADHD, and spectrum disorders. Dr. Pirayesh completed her doctoral work at Loyola Marymount University where she is also faculty and is involved with a number of service organizations including The Association of Educational Therapists.   Connect with Dr. Bibi Pirayesh: Los Angeles Educational Therapy - Dr. Bibi Pirayesh and Associates ChildNEXUS Profile: Dr. Bibinaz Pirayesh Dr. Bibi Pirayesh on LinkedIn   Links and Related Resources: 6 Quick Questions for Parents Concerned About Dyslexia Episode 97: Building Communities of Support and Resistance with Dr. Bibi Pirayesh Episode 132: Social Justice: A Framework for Equity in Education with Charles A. Barrett Phd NCSP   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 165: Helping Your Child with Language-Based Learning Disabilities with Dr. Daniel Franklin
26-12-2023
Ep. 165: Helping Your Child with Language-Based Learning Disabilities with Dr. Daniel Franklin
It’s time to spend some time with family for the holidays and now is a great time to look back at some of the earliest episodes of Diverse Thinking Different Learning. Today, we’re revisiting our conversation with Dr. Daniel Franklin. What is a Language-Based Learning Disability and when should we as parents be concerned? Well, let’s ask an expert! Today my guest is Dr. Daniel Franklin, the founder and clinical director of the Los Angeles based Franklin Educational Services and the author of the book Helping Your Child with Learning-Based Learning Difficulties. In today’s episode my guest and I discuss how the parent-child relationship is an important component of any intervention. We also recognize the fine line between being a helicopter parent and a helpful parent and Dr. Franklin gives great advice on walking that fine line. This conversation will leave you feeling empowered and inspired.   Show Notes: [3:37] - Research shows that many children who have a reading difficulty or diagnosed specific learning disability frequently have a behavioral difference as well, like ADHD. [4:29] - Because of this overlap in learning difficulties, they are grouped under a broader umbrella of Language-Based Learning Disabilities. [6:20] - We want to remember that the human brain, especially a child’s brain, is a social organ that functions best in a context of healthy, positive relationships. [7:32] - Only when a child is in a calm, regulated state can they experience meaningful learning. [9:41] - The difference between a helicopter parent and a helpful parent is that a helicopter parent provides help that is not needed. [11:04] - When we need to provide more help, that is fine, but when help is no longer needed in an area, as parents, we need to step back. [13:39] - Dr. Franklin gives some suggestions on how to help students with writing without being counterproductive. [17:05] - Dr. Franklin emphasizes the importance of identifying underlying difficulties to provide students the correct instruction and intervention. [18:04] - The hierarchy of reading support is discussed in Dr. Franklin’s book and he breaks it down briefly with Dr. Wilson. [19:40] - Dr. Franklin was featured in a documentary called Unteachable by Anthony Sherin which focuses on the importance of student-teacher relationships. [22:05] - Having a strong relationship with students is important in helping them develop self-confidence and reinforce a love of learning. [24:58] - No two kids are the same. No two kids learn the same things in the same way at the same time. [28:11] - Sharing your observations with teachers is important. [30:47] - If you want to know what is going on in a child’s mind, observe their body. If they are slumped over, their brain is slumped, too.   About Our Guest: Dr. Daniel Franklin is the author of Helping Your Child with Language-Based Learning Disabilities, and a co-editor of The Los Angeles Psychologist. He holds a master’s degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a PhD from UCLA in Education. Dr. Franklin has over 30 years of experience in education as a teacher, administrator, and educational consultant.   Connect with Dr. Daniel Franklin: Franklin Educational Services ChildNEXUS Provider Profile - Dr. Daniel Franklin Dr. Franklin on Facebook Dr. Franklin on Twitter Call Dr. Franklin (310) 571-1176   Links and Resources: Helping Your Child with Language-Based Learning Disabilities by Dr. Daniel Franklin Supporting Parents of Children with Language-Based Disabilities Documentary featuring Dr. Daniel Franklin: Unteachable   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 164: 5 Keys to Productive IEPs with April Rehrig
19-12-2023
Ep. 164: 5 Keys to Productive IEPs with April Rehrig
The IEP process is notoriously daunting, overwhelming, and can be confusing to parents. However, parents have the right to be active participants in all aspects of an IEP. There’s more that parents can do to be a part of their child’s education and successfully advocate for the support they need in the classroom. Today’s guest is April Rehrig, the founder of Rise Educational Advocacy and Consulting. April has a unique approach to special education reform that promotes team collaboration and communication to ensure every child feels valued. Through Rise Educational Advocacy, she guides families through the IEP process and helps bridge the gap between schools and parents. This episode is all about the 5 keys to productive IEPs and how to build a relationship with the team of people supporting a child.   Show Notes: [2:09] - April has been working with neurodiverse students since she was a teenager. She shares her background and what drives her passion. [4:45] - An experience in her early years of teaching opened her eyes to presumed competency. [5:32] - After 20 years as a school psychologist, April now bridges the gap between schools and parents. [6:54] - Parents just want their kids to get the support they need, but it is daunting to get started. Most parents don’t know what to expect. [8:41] - Just like building a house, you must have a solid foundation.  [11:02] - If schools and psychologists communicate with parents from the very beginning, it saves time and makes things easier for families. [12:32] - Parents have the opportunity to write a parent report to share during the IEP meeting. [14:41] - Psychologists and teachers are trained to look for what the deficits are. But reports are a snapshot. Really good evaluations are based on multiple measures. [16:44] - What is a child’s inferential learning? Standardized test scores do not provide this information. [19:23] - Comprehensive evaluations drive the IEP. [21:00] - Parents have the right to participate in all aspects of the IEP process. [25:24] - There’s a misnomer called predetermination. April has a different opinion on giving reports before a meeting. [28:09] - Each state and district has a different approach to the IEP process. But something that is universal, the parent input section is often only three lines long. [30:27] - When we take sides, we lose the importance of talking about the child as a team. [32:57] - Parents can get stuck on advocating for a particular service, but should look at weaknesses and the outcomes they want.   About Our Guest: April Rehrig is the founder of Rise Educational Advocacy and Consulting, LLC. She has over 20 years of experience as a school psychologist, teacher, and parent in the public school setting. With her Build a Better IEP™️curriculum, April teaches parents and teachers nationwide how to successfully navigate special education from a strength-based perspective. Her unique approach to special education reform promotes team collaboration and communication. April holds a master’s degree in education and is a Board Certified Education Advocate (BCEA) Fellow. She completed the prestigious Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates (COPAA) SEAT™ 2.0 & 3.0 program, is a Licensed Educational Psychologist (LEP), Certified Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinical Specialist (ASDCS), Master IEP Coach©, and credentialed teacher.   Connect with April: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile April Rehrig Special Education Advocate on LinkedIn Rise Ed Advocacy on Instagram Rise Ed Advocacy on Facebook Rise Ed Advocacy Website   Links and Related Resources: Episode 146: How Parents and Educators Can Collaborate to Help Students Thrive with Shelley Lawrence Episode 157: What Dyslexia Screening in Schools Means For Your Child with Vickie Brett and Amanda Selogie Episode 145: Advocating for Children With Special Needs with Heather Zakson   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 163: Raising Children with Mental Health Challenges with Jan Stewart
12-12-2023
Ep. 163: Raising Children with Mental Health Challenges with Jan Stewart
In her raw and emotional book Hold On Tight: A Parent’s Journey Raising Children with Mental Illness, Jan Stewart shares her deeply personal experience as a mother of two children with wildly different needs. Through the challenges of finding the right diagnoses and treatments, Jan learned to insist on an integrated partnership approach, leading her to then support other parents facing similar struggles. She joins the podcast today to talk about this rollercoaster journey for her as a parent and how the experience led her to work in mental health governance. Her insight is profound because she has certainly walked in the shoes of an overwhelmed mother. Listen in to learn more about her journey and her advice for navigating the ups and downs of yours.   Show Notes: [2:16] - Jan wrote the book to help people understand the pain and struggle in this journey and how to navigate through it. [3:38] - First-time parents worry, but in Jan’s case, it took her years to learn to trust her gut. She knew something was going on. [6:11] - Jan’s son and daughter showed completely different concerns. [7:34] - Her children were so deep in distress; when doctors finally listened, Jan was able to seek the help they needed. [9:27] - The “wait-and-see” approach puts things off for so long until a child is in crisis. [11:01] - Jan doesn’t only provide support for parents, but also provides education. [13:52] - You have to take a breather from time to time when diving into education. But you also need to stay current. [14:28] - Take a collaborative approach with every single person that is a part of your child’s life. [15:37] - If a doctor, therapist, or any other individual working with her child is not fully cooperative, Jan goes elsewhere. [18:19] - The experience can feel like a rollercoaster, with a lot of ups and downs. [19:08] - Be completely open and truly listen to your children. [20:26] - Don’t hide information from your children, especially when it comes to taking medication. [22:42] - Other family members may not understand or support you and your child. They may be misinformed and you can limit the amount of engagement you have with them. [24:34] - The right friends will know how to ask when you need support and how they can help. [26:58] - As a society, we have a responsibility to spread facts. [29:06] - The process for parents can be very overwhelming. [31:23] - Mental illness has such a negative connotation and even villains in movies and media are portrayed with mental illness. [33:15] - Toxic positivity is also a problem on social media. [36:21] - Find Jan’s book online and in some bookstore locations.    About Our Guest: Jan Stewart is a highly regarded mental health governance expert and advocate.  Growing up in New York and moving to Toronto after marrying a Canadian, she was untouched by major adversity throughout her youth and imagined a similar, happy life for her children. In her raw and emotional book Hold on Tight: A Parent’s Journey Raising Children with Mental Illness, she candidly describes the shock she and her husband faced when each of their two young children started exhibiting troubling behaviors.   Connect with Jan: Website   Links and Related Resources: Hold On Tight: A Parent’s Journey Raising Children with Mental Illness by Jan Stewart   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 162: Can Play Therapy Help My Child? with Cathi Spooner, LCSW, RPT-S
05-12-2023
Ep. 162: Can Play Therapy Help My Child? with Cathi Spooner, LCSW, RPT-S
Today, we’re answering the question, “Can play therapy help my child?” But first, we need to understand what play therapy is and what it is not. Our guest, Cathi Spooner shares insights on helping children navigate complex emotions through play therapy. And there’s a lot to talk about! We’ve had several episodes discussing different treatment modalities and information about ways we can provide social and emotional support to our children and adolescents. Play therapy might be the right fit for your child and your family. Listen to find out how Cathi has used play therapy to support children and adolescents struggling with anxiety, depression, trauma, divorce and separation, attachment issues, self-regulation issues, and grief and loss.    Show Notes: [2:56] - Play therapy is about helping children access the therapeutic powers of play through a specific therapy modality. It’s grounded in a theoretical model. [4:32] - Play is the language of children. [5:13] - It is more than just pulling out games and toys. [6:29] - To an outsider looking in, it looks like the counselor or therapist is just playing. But they know how to use play to work through emotions. [7:36] - Children naturally work things out and make sense of the world through play. [10:43] - Cathi describes the types of toys and games in a play therapy room. [12:36] - Anger and aggression are normal emotions and parents tend to want to avoid them. [15:12] - Play gives therapists a way to see what’s going on underneath a child’s behavior. [17:32] - Children need parents to be able to co-regulate emotions. [19:31] - Children can’t be the ones responsible for learning how to regulate their emotions. [22:02] - One key is to empower parents to continue this work at home outside of the therapy room. [24:22] - Parents need support and guidance on how to help their children. [28:20] - If parents don’t trust the therapist, they will not be able to feel comfortable and confident in being the parent they want to be. [31:26] - Expressive art is an amazing modality to incorporate into play therapy to show children other ways to work through and make sense of things without verbally articulating. [33:14] - When we’re in distress, making sense of things is challenging. Play makes it more accessible.   About Our Guest: Cathi Spooner is an LCSW and RPT-S. She has worked with children, adolescents and their families since 1982 in a variety of capacities including therapeutic recreation, teaching special education for children with emotional and learning difficulties, residential mental health treatment programs, substance abuse treatment, and outpatient psychotherapy. Her expertise includes working with children, adolescents and families experiencing trauma and attachment issues as well as depression, anxiety, grief & loss, behavior problems, court-involved youth, homeless populations, ADHD, foster care and adoption issues, parental separation and divorce, and school problems.  Cathi has conducted numerous professional play therapy training sessions at the local, state, national, and international level. Her Play Therapy Academy program prepares child and adolescent therapists to become play therapists. She is the author of Attachment-Focused Family Play Therapy: An Intervention for Children and Adolescents After Trauma (Routledge).   Connect with Cathi: Renewing Hearts Play Therapy Training Website Play and Expressive Arts Therapy Facebook Group LinkedIn Instagram YouTube   Links and Related Resources: Episode 131: Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Kids and Teens with Dr. Shadab Jannati Episode 116: How Dialectical Behavior Therapy Helps Children and Teens with Patricia Gieselman, MFT Episode 130: How Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Strengthens the Family Relationship with Dr. Karrie Lager Q&A with Dr. Karen Wilson Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 161: The Intersection of Neurodivergence and Substance Use with Eric Rydzewski and Chris Wilson
28-11-2023
Ep. 161: The Intersection of Neurodivergence and Substance Use with Eric Rydzewski and Chris Wilson
Research shows that individuals with learning and thinking differences are at higher risk for substance abuse. It is also known that there is a connection between mental health problems, like depression and anxiety, and substance abuse. But now that we know that, what do we do about it? Today’s guests support neurodiverse youth and help with substance use and abuse concerns. Eric Rydzewski and Chris Wilson join me today from Aspen Growth Coaching to help guide us through some of the misinformation on this topic and the many things that people generally don’t understand about the connection between neurodivergence and substance abuse.  In the end, we can’t always stop a teenager from being impulsive, but we can understand why they are more vulnerable to substance abuse and learn what to do to help them.   Show Notes: [2:36] - Teenagers with ADHD are at greater risk for substance use and abuse. [4:37] - Receiving a later diagnosis of something that impacts someone’s daily functioning can lead to seeking comfort in drugs and alcohol. [6:21] - Some people don’t need an official diagnosis to know that they are drawn to substances that make them feel calm or stimulated. [7:59] - Drugs and alcohol seem like a “quick fix” to a struggle or challenge. [9:32] - There is also a lot of societal pressure especially for teens who already feel isolated. [10:44] - It is common for drugs and alcohol to be used as performance enhancement in social connections. [14:20] - Eric and Chris work with a lot of people who function well while using substances, but the dependence grows. [16:48] - Teenagers are naturally impulsive and experimental. Some who are neurodiverse may be more impulsive. [18:51] - The risk of substance abuse is also connected to nutrition and sleep. Part of the work Eric and Chris do is addressing taking care of their bodies. [21:25] - Mental health conditions like depression and anxiety increase risks of substance abuse. These mental health conditions are also seen in those who are neurodiverse. [24:00] - Parents get lost in these situations, but it is important to have healthy boundaries. [25:23] - There are thousands of families in the United States dealing with this. There are a lot of support groups. [27:11] - A critical part of building resilience is knowing there is a caring adult in their corner who can have difficult but supportive conversations with them. [28:40] - What does it look like when an intervention works? Everyone is very different. [32:26] - Recognize if your child is on a self-destructive path and seek the support they need to learn to be healthy and independent.   About Our Guests: Eric Rydzewski Eric is a Licensed Professional Counselor who specializes in working with adolescents and young adults with comorbid neurodivergent stress and addiction issues  He is trained in autism identification and screening and uses an emotionally focused approach to the families he works with as a way of enhancing connection rather than dividing through intervention. He has over 12 years of experience working with neurodivergent populations. Eric lives in Grand Junction, Colorado with his wife and family.   Chris Wilson Chris is a Sobriety, ADHD, and Life Coach. He has a bachelor’s in English Literature and a long professional history as a corporate executive in the maritime shipping industry. After a decade in this high-powered career, Chris walked away from his business success to hike the Pacific Crest Trail and prioritize sobriety and living a more intentional life. After this dramatic life change, Chris has dedicated himself to supporting others with similar experiences. Using the skills he brought with him from his business background, Chris supports his clients to set themselves up for success. Moving away from shame and a failure-focused mindset, Chris teaches a “back to the basics” approach, helping clients establish lifestyle changes that encourage a healthy life while practicing resiliency in the face of relapse, attention challenges, and identity struggles.   Connect with Eric and Chris: Aspen Growth Coaching Website Email Eric: eric@aspengrowthcoaching.com Email Chris: chris@aspengrowthcoaching.com    Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 160: The Sleep-Deprived Teen with Lisa Lewis
21-11-2023
Ep. 160: The Sleep-Deprived Teen with Lisa Lewis
Today’s topic is no stranger to the Diverse Thinking Different Learning Podcast. We’re talking about sleep, but this time, we’re discussing the impact of sleep (and lack thereof) on teens. Lisa Lewis explains it all beautifully in her book The Sleep-Deprived Teen: Why Our Teenagers Are So Tired, and How Parents and Schools Can Help Them Thrive. And in our conversation today, she shares some interesting facts about the adolescent brain, how sleep deprivation impedes brain development, and what we can do about it as parents and as a society.   Show Notes: [2:19] - In the early years of our child’s life, we think about naps and sleep often. But it is something that becomes overlooked as they get older. [3:24] - Adolescence is a time of major brain development. [5:02] - Sleep, specifically, is incredibly important for this process. [6:18] - The number of hours needed for a teen is more than for adults. Teens should be getting 8-10 hours at least of sleep. Young teens should be getting 11 hours. [8:02] - Naturally, teens will start going to bed later. This is a normal rhythm change. [9:25] - There are a number of factors behind why teens are not getting enough sleep. [11:08] - The biggest policy change that could greatly benefit adolescents is a later school start time for middle and high school students. [13:04] - Tech use late at night is a big factor as well as overscheduling. [15:10] - Lisa explains some of the processes that are impacted by sleep deprivation, specifically academically. [16:23] - Mood, irritability, and emotional regulation are greatly impacted by sleep. This is true for adults as well. [17:50] - Sleep deprivation also has a link to suicidality, mental health issues, and impulsivity. [19:20] - Many teens are involved in athletics and sleep deprivation increases risk for injury. Sleep deprivation is a concern for teens learning to drive as well. [20:54] - What are some of the things we can do as parents and as a community? [23:01] - There are many things to consider including homework time and extracurricular activities. [25:11] - Technology is here to stay. But how is it impacting sleep? [26:58] - There are some best practices for parents and teens regarding tech use at night. [29:27] - Making changes in the home needs to be collaborative. [31:26] - Part of technology rules and wind-down routines is being a good role model.   About Our Guest: Lisa L. Lewis is the author of The Sleep-Deprived Teen: Why Our Teenagers Are So Tired, and How Parents and Schools Can Help Them Thrive (described as “a call to action” by Arianna Huffington and “an urgent and timely read” by Daniel H. Pink). Her book, which was reviewed by The New York Times, is an outgrowth of her previous work on the topic, including her role in helping get California’s landmark law on healthy school start times passed. Lewis has written for The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, among others, and has appeared on the TODAY show, WBUR “On Point,” BBC World Radio, and local radio and TV in Los Angeles, San Francisco and elsewhere. She has a master’s degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, an MFA from Mills College, and a bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley. The parent of a teen and a recent teen, Lewis lives in California with her family.   Connect with Lisa: The Sleep-Deprived Teen: Why Our Teenagers Are So Tired, and How Parents and Schools Can Help Them Thrive by Lisa Lewis LisaLLewis.com   Links and Related Resources: Episode 148: How Sleep Affects Academic Performance and Mood The Teen Brain - 6 Things to Know   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 159: The Benefits of Boarding for Diverse Learners with Sara Jackson
14-11-2023
Ep. 159: The Benefits of Boarding for Diverse Learners with Sara Jackson
Parents frequently find themselves searching for the perfect educational environment for their child. And when you have a child who thinks and learns differently, you may also look for an environment where your child has access to interventions that address their unique needs, a program that incorporates clinical support, helps your child develop social-emotional learning and adaptive functioning skills, and provides them with the support of a community of educators and peers. For some students, that could mean a residential or boarding program, where they live and learn in the same place.  Sara Jackson joins us today to talk about the benefits of this type of program for neurodivergent youth. Listen to learn more.   Show Notes: [2:30] - A boarding school is special because a student is getting the full academic learning, but their life after school is intentionally programmed as well. [4:35] - Boarding school integrates social-emotional learning into the day-to-day schedule for students which in many other environments is missing. [6:42] - There is a lot of opportunity for incidental learning. [8:02] - The biggest benefit for neurodiverse students in a residential program is the built-in community. [9:33] - Sara explains that the students they serve are experiencing life-changing events that are building self-confidence. [11:04] - Who is a good candidate for a residential program and what is the right age? It’s a whole family decision. [13:06] - For a child with learning challenges, the struggles are often the focus. But, a personalized education program like this gives the opportunity to focus on strengths and interests. [15:13] - In order to thrive, some students need a specialized program. [16:48] - When students are successful outside of school, it increases confidence during academic learning as well.  [19:01] - Sara describes a typical day for students at Riverview School. [21:16] - Parents are close partners with Riverview School. [22:49] - For more information, visit their website. There are virtual and in-person information sessions available.   About Our Guest: Sara has a BA in Neuroscience from Hamilton College and Master of Social Work from Boston University. She is a licensed clinical social worker. Sara has worked at Riverview School since 2001, in a number of positions including as direct care staff, a clinician, the social pragmatics and behavior specialist and currently as the coordinator of the middle school/high school boarding program.    Connect with Sara: ChildNEXUS School Profile Riverview School Website   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 158: Why I Homeschool with Wendy Zanders
07-11-2023
Ep. 158: Why I Homeschool with Wendy Zanders
Although today’s guest is a declutter coach and has been featured as a guest on the podcast before, she’s here for a completely different reason today. Today, Wendy Zanders is here in her role as a mom who homeschools. This episode is a down-to-earth and realistic conversation about the popular topic of homeschooling. Wendy shares her journey, the ups and downs, the reasons behind her family’s decision, and the possibilities homeschooling has opened up for her children.  If you are thinking about homeschooling or have questions about how you can homeschool more effectively, Wendy will have some answers in this conversation.   Show Notes: [2:06] - Even though the homeschool journey for Wendy is for the whole family, both of her children are homeschooled differently. [3:10] - Some families changed to homeschooling during the pandemic in 2020 and made the decision to continue. [4:22] - Wendy shares the experience of meeting another family that was homeschooled and her daughter knew right away she wanted to be homeschooled as well. [6:20] - It is okay to simply try homeschooling. If you don’t like it or it isn’t the right fit for your family, you can always go back to public school or find another option. [7:48] - If you feel that you are not qualified or not feeling confident in a certain subject, you can find a tutor for support. [9:19] - Wendy shares a bit about their structured school schedule and the things they do that are outside the traditional structure. [10:49] - There are so many different options and you can make the decision that is best for you and your family. [13:14] - Wendy shares the recent milestones for her children. [15:26] - Through her son’s passion and interests, Wendy was able to create the perfect curriculum for him and he is now in a program for welding. [17:10] - An important component of homeschooling is a community. [19:14] - It is a myth that homeschooled children are missing out on the socialization opportunities provided in public schools. [20:42] - There was a big mental shift that Wendy had to make. Unschooling has been the best fit for her and her family. [23:52] - It is not at all required to spend a ton of money on a homeschool curriculum. [25:30] - There doesn’t always have to be a dedicated school space in your home. Your kids may not learn that way.   About Our Guest: Wendy Zanders is a professional organizer, Your Declutter Coach, and a United States Army veteran. Her family has been homeschooling both kids since 2019. They are a special needs homeschooling family that loves to learn outside the box. Her 16-year-old son graduated and is now a professional welder pursuing a career in the automotive industry. Their 10-year-old wants to be a scientist, and they enjoy exploring that path with her. Wendy is the biggest cheerleader for her kids and their journeys.    Connect with Wendy: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Email: wendy@yourdecluttercoach.com  Your Declutter Coach Website   Links and Related Resources: Episode 123: How Decluttering Helps to Manage ADHD Symptoms with Wendy Zanders Episode 151: Parenting with ADHD Insights and Inspiration with Holly Blanc Moses   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 157: What Dyslexia Screening in Schools Means for Your Child with Vickie Brett and Amanda Selogie
31-10-2023
Ep. 157: What Dyslexia Screening in Schools Means for Your Child with Vickie Brett and Amanda Selogie
With a new dyslexia screening law coming into effect next year in the state of California, parents need to know what to expect and what the rights of their children are. To help educate us on what this screener is and what it means for our children, educational attorneys Vickie Brett and Amanda Selogie join the podcast again. Vickie and Amanda are both attorneys and founders of the Inclusive Education Project, which includes an IEP Learning Center and a podcast. As educational attorneys, they focus on advocating for and educating families on their legal rights, especially when it comes to the services their child is entitled to through public education. Today, we’re discussing what this law means and how it impacts all students in Kindergarten through second grade in the state of California. You’ll learn what to expect and how you can be prepared for pushing for a comprehensive evaluation in the event that your child is found to be at risk for dyslexia.   Show Notes: [1:49] - Welcome back, Vickie and Amanda! They were previously on during the COVID-19 pandemic discussing legal rights of students needing services. [4:00] - October is specifically a busy month for IEP meetings and initial assessments. [6:42] - Because of holidays and the busy season, there are a lot of things to accomplish in a short amount of time. [8:08] - It is so important for parents to understand the rights their children have. [9:31] - In 2024, California will have funding for universal screening for dyslexia in students from Kindergarten through second grade. [11:34] - Schools are supposed to implement these screenings in 2024. The goal with this law is it uses a universal screener. [13:23] - Interventions being provided through RTI and reading groups are not enough. [16:46] - The timing in California also coincides with the universal pre-Kindergarten program. [18:18] - Screening is not the same thing as intervention or assessment. They identify kids who are at risk for dyslexia. But then what? [20:30] - Vickie explains how the law works and the requirements it outlines. [23:03] - For a screener to really work, it needs to be done for all students. [24:30] - One common trait of children with dyslexia is that they are able to compensate in the early years of school and tend to be overlooked. [26:47] - Being at risk should be enough of an alert to proceed with a comprehensive evaluation. [29:19] - There are certain things that the school will take care of, but parents need to be vigilant in requesting more if it's needed. [30:52] - With a universal screener, there should be a universal intervention. [34:59] - Amanda thinks that implementation will be left to each county and school district. [37:04] - Is every county going to be able to train and implement this screener? [40:15] - You can find more information on the Inclusive Education Project website.   About Our Guests: Vickie Brett Vickie Brett was born and raised in Southern California and through the Inclusive Education Project she focuses on advocating and educating families about their legal rights. Vickie is committed to strengthening her clients who come to her disheartened and beaten down by the current education system. Because Vickie is bilingual, she represents and empowers many monolingual Spanish-speaking families.  She is a dedicated pro bono attorney for the Superior Court of Los Angeles’s Juvenile and Dependency 317(e) Panel and in the past was a supervising attorney for the UCI Law School's Special Education Law Project.   Amanda Selogie Amanda Selogie received a bachelor’s degree in Child and Adolescent Development, specializing in Education from California State University, Northridge and a Juris Doctorate from Whittier Law School where she served as a Fellow in the prestigious Center for Children's Rights Fellowship Program and served in the school's pro-bono Special Education Legal Clinic. Amanda immersed herself in the world of civil rights and educational advocacy through her work in education, empowerment and advocacy with the Inclusive Education project, supporting inclusion in early education through her appointment to the Orange County Child Care and Development Planning Council and their Inclusion Collaborative Committee, previous work serving as a supervising attorney for UCI Law School’s Education Rights Pro-bono project and coaching of AYSO’s VIP (Very Important Player) program coaching players living with disabilities and creating an inclusive soccer program.   Connect with Vickie and Amanda: Inclusive Education Project Website @inclusiveeducationproject on Instagram Email admin@iepcalifornia.org    Links and Related Resources: Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions Inclusive Education Project Podcast Dr. Karen Wilson on the Inclusive Education Project Podcast   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 156: To Test or Not to Test (ACT/SAT) in the Test-Optional Era with Annika Guy
24-10-2023
Ep. 156: To Test or Not to Test (ACT/SAT) in the Test-Optional Era with Annika Guy
If you have a teen who is preparing for or thinking about applying to college, you are likely aware that some colleges and universities are test optional or even test blind when it comes to ACTs and SATs. But what does that mean? Should students with learning differences, test anxiety, or struggles with test-taking in general take these tests? Annika Guy is the Director of Independent Study/Homeschool and SAT/ACT programming at Hayutin Education and a valued ChildNEXUS member. And while they know so much about test-optional and test-blind colleges and universities, they are here to tell us that it is a constantly changing landscape. We’ve definitely entered a new era of college acceptance processes and even the tests themselves have gone through some evolution over the last several years. So if you and your teen are considering colleges, we now need to answer the question: to test or not to test?   Show Notes: [2:42] - So much has changed in the last few years and it continues to evolve very quickly. [3:49] - There is a lot of conflicting information and opinions when it comes to testing and college prep. This makes the decision to test that much harder. [4:59] - It can be very frustrating to go through testing and then learn that the university or college doesn’t require it. [5:38] - Test-optional means that schools will not require test scores to be submitted when applying, but will look them over if submitted. [7:21] - Test blind means that schools don’t even look at test scores at all even if you submit them. [9:08] - A big concern for students and parents is that learning differences and test-taking difficulties result in scores that don’t reflect a student’s ability and potential. [11:24] - Although it can be confusing, it is ultimately a good thing that there are test-optional and test blind schools. [13:10] - Testing companies are beginning to shift their thinking around the necessity and accuracy of test scores. [14:43] - The SAT has gone through a lot of changes in the last ten years. Now it is a much shorter test and is provided digitally. [17:53] - There are some things that can be put into a test-prep plan including practice tests and test-prep tutors. [21:24] - Hayutin Education is very transparent about the murky waters of testing and test prep. They help students navigate this decision. [23:19] - Homeschooled students need to test and there are other demographics that feel more pressured to test like international students and athletes. [25:01] - Test prep should not be prioritized over keeping up a GPA. [26:36] - Hayutin Education offers a number of services including test prep services, college application guidance, and academic support.   About Our Guest: Annika Guy is the Director of Independent Study/Homeschool and SAT/ACT programming at Hayutin Education. Annika joined the Hayutin administrative team in 2021 after two years on the educator team. Annika has worked with students ranging from elementary school through college in a variety of humanities-based subjects as well as math, science, executive function coaching, independent study/homeschool, and test prep. As Director of Independent Study, Annika is passionate about custom curriculum design and developing the best program for each student’s unique learning style. In their role as Director of Hayutin’s SAT/ACT program, Annika consults with families about the changing landscape of college admissions in the test-optional era, and what that means for students facing the question of whether or not to test.   Connect with Annika Guy: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Hayutin Education Website   Links and Related Resources: Episode 16: The Independent Study Option with Maya Varga Episode 126: Why Self Awareness and Self Determination are Important for College Success with Elizabeth Hamblet Episode 15: From High School to College: Steps to Success for Students with Disabilities with Elizabeth Hamblet   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 155: Providing Support with Virtual Educational Therapy with Rachel Kapp
17-10-2023
Ep. 155: Providing Support with Virtual Educational Therapy with Rachel Kapp
Educational therapy is oftentimes an unknown term for parents and families. Today’s guest has actually shared with us in a previous episode what it is and how it can benefit so many different students in Episode 10: Building Independence Through Educational Therapy. But what we haven’t talked about is what educational therapy looks like… virtually. Welcome back to Rachel Kapp, who is an educational therapist with an extensive background in the field of education. After working with so many types of students through tutoring in private practice, she became passionate about building relationships with and helping students who learn differently. She is now a sought after educational therapist and co-host of the Learn Smarter Podcast. In our conversation today, Rachel shares how virtual educational therapy has changed the way students can access the services they need. She explains the surprising benefits and misconceptions about virtual therapy and how to find the right fit for you and your family.   Show Notes: [1:43] - Rachel was a previous guest on the podcast and introduced educational therapy in episode 10. [4:27] - During the pandemic, for the first time parents saw firsthand the learning challenges of their children. [5:57] - Rachel explains what educational therapy is and what they focus on at Kapp Educational Therapy. [7:12] - While the therapy impacts academics, educational therapy is also extremely beneficial for executive functioning and life skills. [10:02] - Virtual educational therapy is not “Zoom School”.  [11:10] - Compared to in-person educational therapy, virtual therapy has a lot of different benefits including flexibility and, surprisingly, connection with the therapist. [13:11] - One type of therapy isn’t faster than another. Rachel has not seen a difference between the results of in-person and virtual. [15:09] - In most cases, Rachel sees students for 50 minutes twice a week, but when it is virtual, there are a lot of different ways to spend that time. [16:49] - Rachel has had students who are in virtual educational therapy as guests on her podcast and has great connections with them. [19:13] - Writing is typically very challenging for students with executive functioning issues. [21:47] - There’s not a “perfect” age for virtual educational therapy. It depends on the child. [25:27] - When it is the right fit for the family, virtual therapy is so accessible. [27:40] - Be open to alternative solutions. The most important thing is the clinician match.   About Our Guest: Rachel grew up in Los Angeles. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Sociology and minored in Jewish Studies. Rachel began tutoring students in high school, eventually choosing to pursue a career in education. For over six years, Rachel was a lead preschool teacher, where she gained a firm foundation in explicit teaching. Rachel has been a tutor in private practice since 2004, working with students in a variety of subjects, including all levels of math, reading, history, and writing. After working with so many types of students over the years and realizing she was passionate about building relationships with and helping students who learn differently, Rachel decided to pursue educational therapy. She completed her coursework at California State University, Northridge, in December 2015 and Masters degree in December 2016. In her free time, Rachel loves spending time with her husband, Adam, son, Elliot, and their dog, Fritzy, watching Cal Football, cooking for friends, and spinning. Rachel is a Board Certified Member of the Association of Educational Therapists and an active participant in ongoing education through the International Dyslexia Association. She is also trained in Wilson Reading Systems.   Connect with Rachel Kapp: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Kapp Educational Therapy Group Website @KappEdTherapy on Instagram Learn Smarter Podcast @LearnSmarterPodcast on Instagram Email: hello@kappedtherapy.com    Links and Related Resources: The Intersection of Executive Function, ADHD, and Other Learning Differences Episode 10: Building Independence Through Educational Therapy with Rachel Kapp   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.
Ep. 154: Why Self-Efficacy and Self-Advocacy are Important for Diverse Learners with Ashley Harding
10-10-2023
Ep. 154: Why Self-Efficacy and Self-Advocacy are Important for Diverse Learners with Ashley Harding
Today’s guest is Ashley Harding and we’re discussing the importance of students having a sense of belonging in their learning environment. Ashley is a valued member of the ChildNEXUS community and a compassionate advocate for diverse learners. In this episode, Ashley explains how impactful a sense of belonging is to a student. Knowing they hold a significant space somewhere, feeling a sense of connection and safety, and knowing that their educational needs are being met while also getting the support they need are critical keys to the concept of “mattering”. All of these things have long-term outcomes that go far beyond academic mastery and it's important for educators to foster this and value a child’s sense of belonging. This is what is going to help students thrive and reach their full potential. It’s not just about academic mastery. Listen on to find out how students can learn self-efficacy and self-advocacy and how this can change the trajectory of their success.   Show Notes: [2:31] - North Star Academics was founded on three principles: academic mastery, self-efficacy, and parent engagement. [3:38] - In Ashley’s experience, the disconnect for a lot of students is not having a feeling of belonging. [5:37] - Students have ecosystems of their own. How do they feel connected to their school and is there a gap? [7:04] - Ashley describes some of the things they look at when a student begins with North Star Academics. [8:11] - We have to start with our own internal biases. Bias is well beyond culture. [9:34] - Communicating with educators can be challenging with new families. [10:47] - How are we evaluating processes in order to have a continuum of success? [12:58] - Investment in private and independent schools is a social justice issue. [14:33] - Stakeholders need to be tuned into the needs of every student, but students need to also be aware of their own learning profile as well. [16:05] - Academic mastery is often the easier part of this. [18:37] - When parents have a deference with teachers, it prevents the child from getting what they need. Advocacy needs to be modeled. [21:27] - You are not waiting to be empowered. You have power and are working in collaboration. If you aren’t empowered, is this the right placement? [24:16] - If students aren’t getting the accommodations they require, is it the right place for them? [26:55] - This is a long term process. What does it take for your child to be successful not just this school year, but the next one and beyond? [28:01] - It’s important to meet with the school in order to support the child. [29:53] - Schools are often focused on academic mastery. [31:20] - Research shows that if a child has just one person invested in them, they are more likely to be successful. [33:30] - Space is not just physical space. People at school should be safe spaces for students as well.   About Our Guest: Ashley Harding is a passionate fourth-generation educator and the Founder of North Star Academics. With a decade of experience, she's committed to improving the educational experience for children and families nationwide. Born and educated in West Los Angeles, she holds a Bachelor of Science from USC and a master's degree from Tufts University. Her focus includes creating social capital and support for students and families of color, and she has previously served as Director of Family and External Engagement for KIPP DC. Ashley's interests include promoting veganism, wearing black Chucks, and enjoying 1990s R&B.   Connect with Ashley Harding: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Email: ashley@northstaracademics.org North Star Academics Website   Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Check out some amazing schools for incredible students   The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.