Odyssey & Muse

John Jurko II

Odyssey & Muse is a podcast about creativity, adventure and living life without a map. Host John Jurko II (@johnjurko) dives into conversations with interesting and talented artists, travelers, innovators and adventure junkies to discuss how they brought their creations and journeys to life. John will dig into the big questions like how to overcome fears, how to plan and execute a large project, and how to discover the things that drive you. Finding your true North. Subscribe, share and rate us. read less
Society & CultureSociety & Culture

Episodes

Ep 21: Joanna Kalafatis - Lose the Map on exploring a life of acting and travel blogging.
18-12-2017
Ep 21: Joanna Kalafatis - Lose the Map on exploring a life of acting and travel blogging.
Joanna Kalafatis is an actress living and working in Los Angeles as well as the travel blogger and photographer behind Lose the Map. When she’s not auditioning or acting she spends her time exploring other countries where she stays, eats and drinks with locals to really get to know the culture. “When your environment changes, it changes you.” In this episode, we dive into Joanna’s journey into the creative arts, how an accident with a kombi taxi changed the way she looked at her life, what she’s learned from traveling solo, and how to write a captivating travel blog. We also talk about her love of acting, how to stay out of trouble while traveling, tips for moving to LA, and so much more. I had so much fun chatting with Joanna, and I think you will get a ton out of this conversation. “Traveling for blogging is not the same as lying by a pool with a martini.” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. 5 Key Takeaways - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1. Being alone in Japan is something I recommend everyone does at least once in their life. 2. When you throw yourself into travel abroad alone, you come out more confident and more secure in yourself. 3. When writing a travel blog, the more you can niche down the better. Write with a lot of personality. 4. When moving to LA for acting or the arts, have longer expectations and stay at it. It’s a marathon. 5. “Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.” ~Earl Nightingale Show Notes (Ep 21) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Intro and latest obsessions [01:25] Joanna’s work and art [04:58] What came first, travel or creativity? [07:20] When did you start traveling alone [10:38] Letting go of things that go wrong [13:54] Process for meeting and getting taken in by locals [15:37] How do you answer the question, “How do I travel more?” [17:33] Biggest personality/character change from solo travel [18:56] The blog Lose the Map [22:05] When did photography take precedence [26:25] Advice for starting a travel blog [30:02] What inspires you to take a picture or write a blog post [31:32] Do you try to get off the beaten path [33:52] How structured is your travel [35:36] How do you manage acting and travel [37:55] How did you get into acting [41:16] What advice do you have for people moving to Los Angeles [43:69] How do you overcome the “pick me” mentality that a lot of creatives suffer from [46:20] Do you have any habits or rituals to help you stay focused or improve your acting/blogging skills [49:57] Do you have anything you do to stay on top of work while on the road [52:40] Do you have anything you wish people would ask you about blogging or acting [54:01] What media do you consume while on the road [57:30] Who do you think of when you hear the word successful [01:01:58] How long do you have to be in one place before you have to travel [01:03:32] Are there any other major fears or obstacles you’ve had to overcome [01:04:47] Do you have any other projects you are working on [01:10:52] Final advice [01:10:52]
Ep 20: Daniel E. Williams - BGSU professor and indie filmmaker on making a study of cinema.
03-01-2017
Ep 20: Daniel E. Williams - BGSU professor and indie filmmaker on making a study of cinema.
Daniel E. Williams received his MFA in Film from Howard University in 1998 and in 2000 he won Best of Show at the Rosebud Film and Video Festival for his thesis film A Thousand Days a Year. He currently teaches film production at Bowling Green State University, while continuing to independently write, produce, and direct award-winning films. I even had the pleasure of working on his latest project, Autumn Blue, as the 1st AC. “Cinema is not just a product, it’s a form of cultural expression.” In this conversation, we dig into Daniel’s upbringing in St. Louis, his path through film school, and his process as an independent filmmaker. We get into Daniel’s thoughts on teaching filmmaking and what mistakes he sees beginning filmmakers make again and again. We talk about filmmaking as a craft, getting to know your equipment before you get on set, methods for improving your creativity and so much more. This episode is definitely worth the listen if you’re considering going to film school or becoming a filmmaker. “Go to film school if you want to immerse yourself in the study of cinema.” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 6 Key Takeaways 1. Know what you are saying with your film. You don’t want to be the filmmaker that lacks an understanding of the ideology that is being expressed in your film. 2. Bond with the equipment before you go on a shoot. The more you know how to use the equipment the more proficient you will be on set. Read the manual. 3. Be knowledgeable of the history of cinema. Keep your textbooks and use the library. Watch films from the Criterion Collection. 4. On set, as in life, listen to your conscience. If your inner voice is speaking to you, pay attention. 5. As the director, even if you don’t make the right choice you have to be confident in that choice. You are the leader and your emotions and moods trickle down to the rest of the cast and crew. 6. Get away from film for periods of time. Expose yourself to other things, read widely, and experiment with other art forms. These become fuel for your work. - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 20) Intro and where Daniel grew up [01:32] Growing up in Ferguson [06:20] Origins of creativity [12:52] Biggest obstacles to play [18:47] Interest in filmmaking [20:41] Going to film school [27:40] Biggest takeaways from Howard [35:30] Electronic news-gathering (ENG) Studying English [39:44] What stuck with you from grad school [44:01] Thinking through the theory before making [50:19] Why an MFA and how did that lead to teaching [54:03] Teaching philosophy [59:50] Film as art vs. product [01:07:10] Strategy for catching up and keeping up with cinema [01:11:02] What do you do to improve your craft that others do not [01:19:10] Films and process [01:28:32] Why still shooting with film [01:34:22] What beginner filmmakers do that drive you crazy [01:46:47] Current projects [01:57:26] Favorite recent films [02:03:56] More favorites [02:06:26] Final advice for attending film school [02:16:05]
Man Bike World Pt. 2 – Halfway down the Great Divide Trail. Bicycles, bears, friends and fires.
01-09-2016
Man Bike World Pt. 2 – Halfway down the Great Divide Trail. Bicycles, bears, friends and fires.
This is a special mini-episode of Odyssey and Muse where we check in with people that are about to embark on or are in the middle of an adventure around the world. In this episode I catch up with Russ McCoy of Man Bike World. Russ is in the midst of his Great Divide Mountain Bike Tour. I interviewed him back in July just before he shoved off. If you haven’t listened to that episode you can catch up here. “I saw this little baby grizzly bear cub running across the road.” Russ began his tour in Banff, Canada and has traveled through Montana, Idaho and is most of the way through Wyoming. In this conversation, we talk about his early encounter with grizzly bears, his misfortunes with bear spray, his new friends on the trail, how his gear and body are both holding up, and about all of the amazing sites seen and experiences had. “You can’t challenge the rumor. So we were prepared for having no water.” We’re planning to catch up with Russ when he reaches the end of his 2,745 mile journey, so make sure to check back for updates. If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 3 Key Takeaways 1. If you’re going to be in grizzly bear country, it can pay to have a can of bear spray. 2. Be careful how you store your bear spray. If you puncture the can it can be bad news for you. 3. If you’re riding the Great Divide Trail try to stay at Barbara’s Cyclist Only Cabin. - - - - - Show Notes (Man Bike World Pt. 2) Introduction and review of Great Divide tour [00:56] Beginning the journey and the bear spray incident [03:18] How did your body adjust to the riding [14:05] Traveling solo vs with others [15:22] What has the terrain been like [16:28] How much water would you carry [20:26] Favorite sites and the treat of forest fires [21:25] Gear issues [29:08] Special moments on the ride [32:20] Experiences using tech to record and connect online [35:07] Plans for the next few days and the rest of the trip [38:19]
Ep 19: Ryan Bury – Burning Shade Productions, producing movies and reading a book a week.
20-08-2016
Ep 19: Ryan Bury – Burning Shade Productions, producing movies and reading a book a week.
Ryan Bury is originally from Perrysburg, Ohio. Since graduating Bowling Green State University, he has lived and worked in Los Angeles. He’s been the post-production manager on TV shows like America’s Got Talent, The X Factor, The Secret Lives of Americans and more. He’s a co-founder of Burning Shade Productions, and together with Sean Cruser he has written and produced many short films and features. “Save up a little money and just do it.” In this episode we learn about how Ryan got into filmmaking, his passion for Classic films, his move to Los Angeles, and how he connected with Sean Cruser to form Burning Shade Productions. We dig into Ryan’s writing process, his work in TV, what he does as a producer and his year of reading a book a week. He even reveals his cocktail of choice. Hint: It tastes like a campfire. Some great stuff in this one and it’s always fun to catch up with Ryan. “What would Billy Wilder do?” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 5 Key Takeaways 1. As a writer living in Los Angeles, it’s crucial to get work that pays the bills and allows you the time to write. 2. Everything seems to move extra slow in LA. Don’t loose sight of your goals and keep making progress. 3. Keep a small notebook and jot down any idea you have, good or bad. 4. When writing dialogue ask yourself, “Would the words alone be enough to captivate the audience?” 5. Don’t be someone that sits around and waits for something to happen. Go make it happen. - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 19) Intro and where Ryan grew up [01:30] The movies Ryan was obsessed with as a kid [04:30] Majoring in Film Production at BGSU [06:40] Meeting Sean Cruser and writing process [09:40] Moving to Los Angeles [16:11] Getting steady work in Los Angeles [18:39] How Burning Shade Productions came about [20:29] Finding Actors and Crew [24:26] The making of Adrift [26:08] What’s next for Burning Shade Productions [31:18] Biggest Obstacles or Fears [32:54] How to get self in writing zone [34:36] How do you improve your skills [36:28] The book a week project [38:47] What are you most passionate about right now [49:59] Drink of Choice [54:27] Favorite writers and filmmakers [55:38] Final advice for novice filmmakers [59:58]
Ep 18: Gary Arndt - Everything Everywhere, how to blog like a pro and travel for 9 years.
11-08-2016
Ep 18: Gary Arndt - Everything Everywhere, how to blog like a pro and travel for 9 years.
Gary Arndt has mastered the art of world travel. He sold his house in 2007 and has been on the road ever since. A short time into his journey he decided to take his blogging and photography seriously, and within 4 years he went from amateur to winning multiple awards. “Travel allows you to see connections between places.” Gary has been to all 7 continents and has visited over 175 countries and territories. He has one of the larger collections of National Geographic magazines in the world, he’s gone dog sledding in the Yukon, bungee jumped in New Zealand, landed on an aircraft carrier, ridden in a Formula 1 car, and scuba dived all around the world. The list of adventures and accomplishments go on. “The ability to adapt is much better than the ability to plan.” In this conversation we talk about the genesis of Gary’s travel bug, his decision to hit the road, how he taught himself the art of photography and blogging, the success of Everything Everywhere, some of the biggest mistakes beginner bloggers make, the worst question Gary constantly gets, what he wishes people would ask him, some of Gary’s recent adventures, his podcasting, his obsession with Game of Thrones and what’s next for Gary. Whether you’re a traveler or a creative there is something in this episode for you. “Build an audience and the money will come.” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 6 Key Takeaways 1. Don’t spend too much time planning for a trip. Details will inevitably change, and you can learn more about the area from the locals once you are on the ground. 2. Politics are increasingly split between a cosmopolitan world view and a parochial world view. Travel allows you to see how others live; that your way is not the only way to lead a good life. It removes the fear of the “other”. 3. Don’t worry about things like Google Analytics and Instagram posting times, especially when your work is not remarkable. You need to improve the quality of your writing, photography, etc. first. 4. Web traffic is not your audience. Traffic is a way to build your audience. You must create content that is compelling enough for people to want to come back and spread the word. 5. Travel is a great way to learn. By observing other cultures, learning the history behind UNESCO sites, having conversations with people; you can begin to make new connections and have a greater understanding of the way the world works. 6. Never ever ever go to a nightclub while traveling. Nothing good ever happens at a nightclub. - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 18) Intro and recent travels [02:03] Where Gary grew up [04:07] Genesis of the travel bug [06:40] Selling house and traveling the world [11:46] Things done while traveling that normally would not [16:16] Travel now compared to travel when started [19:09] Learning from travel [22:33] The dangers of travel [23:59] Everything Everywhere the blog [26:50] How to improve photography [31:13] Blogging turning point [37:45] How would life be different without the blog [43:50] Why podcasting [45:10] What bad questions do you get vs. questions you want [53:37] Is it hard to disconnect [56:07] Biggest obstacles to making the leap [57:27] Could the world use more travelers [58:50] Favorite recent trip [01:00:22] Most obsessed with right now [01:03:47] Final advice for travelers [01:11:25] - - - - - Related Episodes Ep 13: Hannah Nicol – Wanderlust, traveling Southeast Asia and benefits of liberal arts. Ep 6: Mislav Marohnić – Vagabond Programmer
Ep 17: Matthew Scott – How to light a scene, share your failures and work toward mastery.
29-07-2016
Ep 17: Matthew Scott – How to light a scene, share your failures and work toward mastery.
Matthew Scott is an Australian cinematographer living in Tasmania. He is constantly exploring and pushing for the mastery of his craft. He also enjoys cooking, retro games, playing piano and going on adventures with his lover. “Share shit. Be a voice.” In this episode we dive deep. We talk about how Matt quit high school, got a job, and focused on his love of photography. How he later quit his job and decided to pursue a career as a cinematographer. We dig into his all or nothing attitude, his process for lighting a scene, working with crew members, improving his craft, his desire to share his work through his blog mattscottvisuals.com; including his successes and failures, and the pressures and pleasures of living his dream as a director of photography. “Set ridiculous challenges for yourself.” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 5 Key Takeaways 1. A great formula for lighting a scene: Block, Light, Rehearse, Tweak, Shoot. 2. Play games with yourself to improve your craft. Try to guess exposures on set. Guess what shot will come next while watching a movie. Set ridiculous challenges for yourself; restrictions like sticking to one focal length or f/stop. 3. When you’re starting out, don’t worry about being completely original. Take what you learn from others and try to make it your own. 4. After getting a decent camera, and learning it inside out, spend your money on lighting. Start with two soft sources and two hard sources. 5. Share shit and be a voice. Post your camera test of your cat. Share whatever you’re working on or interested in. It’s a great way to connect with others and it can lead to opportunities down the road. - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 17) Born in India and blessed by the Dalai Lama [01:54] Melbourne Where Matt found his love for creativity [05:09] When did it seem like cinematography could be a viable career [11:41] When did Matt get his first video camera and post program [14:35] Sony Z1 Adobe Premiere Pro EDIUS Was there a point when he decided to start making films [17:48] Network 10 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer Tasmania Cinematography workshops and internet for inspiration vs comparison [22:00] How long has Matt been blogging [30:47] mattscottvisuals.com MTS Films on Vimeo Tips for lighting a scene [31:30] Tips and tricks for lighting without a meter [43:42] How much has blogging and analyzing movies played a role in your growth [50:03] Matt’s dissection of Prisoners Matt’s dissection of Inglorious Bastards Where should a new cinematographer invest their time and money [58:02] RED Cameras Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera How Matt creates his lighting diagrams [01:06:31] Matt Workman Learning Davinci Resolve [01:09:45] Davinci Resolve How knowing color grading can help on set [01:14:33] Things that Matt does to improve that others do not [01:17:05] Matt’s routine for preparing for a new shoot [01:20:17] The biggest decision that has propelled Matt as a cinematographer [01:23:24] How much you consume vs produce [01:29:30] Biggest influences [01:32:30] 411 Video Magazine Stillmotion Canada Frédéric Chopin Roger Deakins Coen Brothers Up-and-coming projects [01:38:30] MTS Colour [01:41:01] Some favorites [01:44:29] The Invitation Z For Zachariah A Serious Man The Hunter Final advice for photographers and cinematographers [01:49:33]
Man Bike World Pt. 1 - Russ McCoy on bears, bikes and his approaching Great Divide tour.
21-07-2016
Man Bike World Pt. 1 - Russ McCoy on bears, bikes and his approaching Great Divide tour.
This is a special episode of Odyssey and Muse. This is going to be the first of possibly many little in-between-isodes where we check in with people that are about to embark on or are in the middle of an adventure around the world. In this episode I talk with Russ McCoy of Man Bike World. He was the second person I interviewed for this podcast, episode 2, and he is the first repeat guest. “It’s 2,745 miles from Banff, Canada to Antelope Wells, New Mexico.” Russ has been on two big Bicycle tours and he is about to leave on his third in a few days. But this time he’s changing it up. He will be riding down the Great Divide mountain bike trail and spending a lot of time off-road for the first time. In this conversation, we talk about the differences in mountain biking verses his previous street tours, we dig into his anxieties, which include bear attacks, his philosophy on wearing helmets, last minute bicycle setup changes, and how he plans to update his blog along the way. “When bears are around, never eat at your camp.” We’re planning to catch up with him again when he’s halfway through the 2,745 mile journey, so make sure to check back for updates. If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 3 Key Takeaways The Great Divide mountain bike trail is a 2,745 mile run from Banff, Canada to Antelope Wells, New Mexico. 85% of which is unpaved forest road. When traveling through bear country, never eat at your camp, never store food in your tent, which includes gum and toothpaste, and hang your food in a tree. There are sections of the Great Divide trail where you need to be able to carry or collect enough water for 4 to 5 days. Take water purification tablets, a filter and a way to carry 10 liters of water. - - - - - Show Notes (Man Bike World Pt. 1) Introduction to the Great Divide mountain bike trail [01:04] Review of Russ’s past bicycle tours [02:06] Explaining in detail, the Great Divide tour [06:03] The challenges of the tour [08:04] What makes Russ anxious about this tour [11:30] Last minute bicycle setup changes [16:05] DaBrim and the great helmet debate [20:33] What drives Russ to embark on these tours [25:01] Pros and cons of solo touring [26:31] What Russ is looking forward to the most on this tour and his blogging strategy [29:22]
Ep 16: Bobby McCall – The Dirty Hooks, leaving a musical legacy and avoiding the charlatans.
11-06-2016
Ep 16: Bobby McCall – The Dirty Hooks, leaving a musical legacy and avoiding the charlatans.
Bobby McCall is a singer, songwriter and musician from Las Vegas. He bought a guitar when he was 17 and has been focused on honing his skills and writing music ever since. After parting ways with the band The Ill Figures, he started the gritty rock trio The Dirty Hooks with bandmates Anthony Ratto III and Jenine Cali. They made the decision to write and record the music that they wanted to hear, and in 2012 they released their debut album Electric Grit to critical acclaim. In this conversation we dig into Bobby’s beginnings growing up in Las Vegas, his path to rock and roll, and his desire to leave a legacy with his work. We get into the formation of The Dirty Hooks, how to avoid the charlatans of the music industry, producing and releasing your own album, and some of Bobby’s philosophies on creating great music and balancing work, life and art. Remember to check out The Dirty Hooks on Soundcloud and Spotify, and if you really dig them, support your artists by purchasing their album. If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 5 Key Takeaways 1. When finding your voice, be as weird as you can and try to have some hooks in there. You need to be original in some way. 2. You can’t chase a record deal and you can’t chase a style that’s relevant now, because by the time you get there you will be old news. 3. Use social media to your advantage, but watch for predators in the music business. There will always be charlatans trying to sell you more likes, listens and air time. These do not get results and they suck your money and resources. 4. “The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There’s also a negative side.” ~ Hunter S. Thompson 5. The only thing you can do is write good music and put it out there. Focus on leaving a legacy. - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 16) Growing up in Las Vegas [01:50] How Bobby got into music and his first guitar [07:22] The first band [10:26] How The Dirty Hooks came to be [17:00] The Sound of The Dirty Hooks [23:35] Playing the baritone guitar and favorite effects [27:55] How the writing duties are split for the band [32:36] The strategy for the Electric Grit Release [35:01] The Dirty Hooks social media strategy [41:31] Music festivals and the Vegas scene [43:09] The making of a music video [47:33] Plans for the next album [50:53] The work / life / art balance [56:06] Current musical influences and other likes [01:00:09] Final advice for musicians [01:03:49]
Ep 15: Vic May – Success as an actor in LA, get an agent with a beard, and keep making stuff.
07-06-2016
Ep 15: Vic May – Success as an actor in LA, get an agent with a beard, and keep making stuff.
Vic May is from, Anamosa, Iowa. He grew up in a creative family where he was encouraged to pursue his desire to act in theater. He graduated from Simpson College, then lived in Chicago, acting in the Red Tape Theater and other venues before moving with is wife Mackenzie to Los Angeles, where they currently reside. Some of his recent work includes acting in a Geico / Vikings commercial, modeling for the Centura Health Pioneer Campaign, acting in the movie Trafficked with Ashley Judd, and producing and staring in the short film Adrift. In this conversation we dig into the details of moving to LA and some of the mistakes Vic sees his fellow actors make. We talk about Vics methods for preparing for a part, how to get an agent with a beard, why having a script locked before a production begins is important, how to make progress and stay sane while constantly being rejected, what it’s like to be on the set of a Geico commercial, nightmare acting stories, and much more. I also want to point out that I just saw on twitter that Vic and his team are in the process of raising finishing money for their film Adrift, which we talk about in detail during this podcast. So if you like this man, and want to see him succeed, go to the Kickstarter page here, and help him get this project to the finish line. And if you need a little more motivation, Vic is about to become a father, so help a dad out! If you want to hear more shows like this, rate and review us on iTunes. - - - - - 6 Key Takeaways 1. Biggest mistake when moving to Los Angeles is to only stay for a short period in hopes of finding work. It takes time to build up a network and make progress in the business. You must be patient and always be doing something (take classes, setup meetings, go to auditions). 2. When looking for an acting class, audit as many as you can for free, and find a teacher that matches your style of learning and pushes you to grow. 3. The script you receive for a production is often a direct reflection of how the shoot will be run. If it is terrible (poor grammar, typos, incorrect formatting, etc.) then the production is likely to be disorganized. Unless you are new to LA and desperate for work, steer clear of these. 4. Make sure that your script is locked (finalized) before you go on to location to shoot. This will help avoid heated arguments and costly last minute changes to the shooting schedule. Also, keep the on-set boozing to a minimum. 5. When preparing for a role, first get off the book (memorize the script). If you have time, try journaling from the perspective of the character as a way to get in their mind during a difficult scene. Find what you want from the other character in the scene and figure out how they would respond to your actions. 6. You get told no a lot as an actor. To stay in a positive mindset, take some control by talking to friends about creating and then create something with them (a scene, a short, a skit). Meditate and clear your mind by getting out in nature or surfing. - - - - - Follow Vic May Twitter @jvicmay Facebook.com/jvicmay - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 15) How Vic got started working with Burning Shade Productions [04:24] Move to Chicago to pursue theater acting [19:07] Moving to Los Angeles – pitfalls and advice [25:39] Advice for finding the right acting classes for you [35:44] Production horror stories deciding if a project is worth doing [38:47] Vic’s process for preparing for roles [52:52] Auditioning and growing a beard to get an agent [57:58] Working on commercials [01:07:59] Overcoming rejection as an actor [01:18:47] Vic’s likes and influences [01:22:55] New and up-and-coming projects Vic is working on [01:27:20] Final advice for filmmakers [01:29:42] - - - - - Share Us Make sure to like and share us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Subscribe and rate the show at iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Google Play and more.
Ep 14: Marquette Jones - Get your movie made, win at grad school and crack the film fest.
18-05-2016
Ep 14: Marquette Jones - Get your movie made, win at grad school and crack the film fest.
Marquette Jones is from Youngstown, Ohio, not far from where I grew up. She’s an alumna of NYU’s graduate film program, but before becoming a filmmaker, Marquette was a public interest attorney in Oakland, California. Her work includes her most recent film, Forgiving Chris Brown, along with Round on Both Sides, Tunk, Heroes Wanted and Streets 2 Suites. She has also produce many other projects from short films, to commercials and PSAs for the Women in Film program. When she is not busy writing, producing, or directing, Marquette indulges her obsession with color through her ever-growing nail polish collection. In this conversation we get into everything. When it comes to filmmaking, we learn her thoughts on grad school – the good and the bad, her strategy for submitting to film festivals – they are detailed, how she writes, directs and staffs up for her films, and some writing advice she received from Spike Lee himself. We talk about her winding path from law degree to a creative career, her advocacy for women in film, and we even learn about her desire to read minds as a child. There is a ton valuable information and Marquette is a joy to listen to. If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 6 Key Takeaways 1. At grad school take advantage of the community and the equipment. Don’t wait be assigned a project. Make as many things as you can. 2. When staffing up for a production, only hire people you don’t have to watch. 3. Your eyes should be on the thing after the thing. Always be prepared with your next project. You must be ready when opportunity strikes. 4. When writing ask yourself, “What would really happen in this situation?” Use music to put yourself into the mood of the characters. Write a draft from each characters perspective. 5. Movies made by women filmmakers make up a small percentage of what makes it to theaters. Support your women filmmakers. Listen to Marquette’s podcast Directing Magic. 6. The film festival circuit gives you something to talk about and promote on social media. Being accepted legitimizes your film, brings awareness and attracts potential support for future projects. - - - - - Follow Marquette Jones Twitter @Marquette_Jones Facebook.com/marquettejones.filmmaker Marquette on IMDB Hotcomb Pictures Directing Magic Podcast - - - - - Show Notes (Ep 14) The ins and outs of Directing the NYU thesis film, Round on Both Sides. [03:11] How to handle the pressure while directing. [09:50] Early days in Ohio, reading minds, and budding creativity. [19:29] Law school to film school. The realization. [22:35] What Marquette didn’t learn from NYU, but should have. [27:38] Working with and learning from the legend, Spike Lee. [38:09] Lessons learned from moving to Los Angeles. [45:58] The roles of marketing and self-promotion in your success as a filmmaker. [53:15] Experiencing the icky side of LA as a woman filmmaker. [59:27] The making of Forgiving Chris Brown. [01:21:16] Mastering the film festival circuit. [01:34:12] Final questions, likes and advice for filmmakers. [01:48:54] - - - - - Share Us Make sure to like and share us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Subscribe and rate the show at iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Google Play and more.
Ep 13: Hannah Nicol - Wanderlust, traveling Southeast Asia and benefits of liberal arts.
04-11-2015
Ep 13: Hannah Nicol - Wanderlust, traveling Southeast Asia and benefits of liberal arts.
Hannah Nicol is an academic advisor in international student affairs, teaches ESL classes at a university level, and spends all of her spare time traveling and dancing. “I can do anything for a year.” In this conversation we go into her early life growing up in Nigeria, the last 4 years she’s spent living in China and traveling Southeast Asia, how her liberal arts degree challenged her old worldview, her love of salsa dancing as a way to connect with others around the globe, and her desire to continue traveling the world and eating new and amazing foods. “If you’re 20 and healthy, travel the world.” If you want to hear more shows like this, rate us on iTunes and let us know. - - - - - 5 Key Takeaways 1. Salsa dancing is a great way to connect with others while traveling alone. There are festivals located all around the world. 2. Keep some kind of record of your experiences. Carry a small journal with you when you travel. Later in life you will be able to look back at all that you have done. 3. Going to college can open up the world to you and allow you to think freely. Especially if you grew up in a closed family or culture. 4. The world is not as mean as we think it is. People are generally kind and willing to help you. 5. Travel doesn’t have to be expensive. Pay attention to frequent flyer programs, and avoid the touristy areas. - - - - - Show Notes Intro / Trip to Cambodia [00:31] Cambodia Tuk-tuk Angkor Wat What took Hannah to Southeast Asia – Fulbright and beyond [02:59] Taiwan Fulbright Fellowship Macau Hong Kong How Hannah became interested in education and growing up in Africa [10:24] Philosophy Department of Philosophy – Bowling Green State University Nigeria Cultural norms and global awareness [21:47] Umbrella Revolution Travels through Southeast Asia [26:02] Frequent-Flyer Program Bali Myanmar Favorite experiences from traveling in Southeast Asia [33:44] Sri Lanka Nepal Connecting with others through [37:56] Salsa Dancing Work life as university teacher in Hong Kong [42:42] Benefits of health happiness and travel first [46:03] Journaling to capture memories and create positive focus [52:35] Obstacles and fears in a life of travel [58:54] One month yoga training in India [01:03:58] Association for Yoga and Meditation – India John’s 2014 PCH Bicycle Tour Habits and rituals / exercise for happiness [01:09:02] Major life influences [01:12:22] NACADA – National Academic Advising Association Favorite books [01:20:38] The Poisonwood Bible – Barbara Kingsolver Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia – Elizabeth Gilbert Arthur Schopenhauer Friedrich Nietzsche Simone de Beauvoir Daniel C. Dennett Brave New World – Aldous Huxley 1984 – George Orwell Final advice [01:25:52] Peace Corps Article by Hannah in the eight Vector publication - - - - - Related Episodes Ep 6: Mislav Marohnić – Vagabond Programmer Ep 4: Liam Garrison – Adventure Junkie